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Dissenting Voices is a student engineered eJournal collaboratively designed, authored, and published by undergraduate Women and Gender Studies majors in connection with their Women and Gender Studies Senior Seminar at the College at Brockport. Dissenting Voices grows out of a course learning structure through which Women and Gender Studies students could reflect upon their undergraduate experience in the discipline, and through engagement, activism, and synthesis of acquired knowledge, establish a theoretical foundation to inform future feminist practices. Course readings comprised students’ discipline-specific interests, enabling an intellectual forum in which majors dialogued on a women and gender focused topic. This work culminated in a meaningful capstone project grounded in contemporary and emerging feminist scholarship. Journal topics span issues organic to college campuses and surrounding communities. In broader strokes, they call into question contested gender equity measures overlaying home and nation. Dissenting Voices preserves the authenticity of student voice, sanctioning a wide range of ability and talent as engendered within students’ senior seminar coursework.

Current Issue: Volume 6, Issue 1 (2017)

. . . Dissenting Voices volume six is the largest volume to date, representing ten authors who write across a wide span of topics important to the Women and Gender Studies discipline. In Opening Voices, two essays introduce the volume. Essay one is a timely study of peace and security which asks, where are the women in the teaching of international relations? Essay two interrogates the witching of women throughout history, arguing that society uses the witch image to marginalize women who push back against patriarchal codes. More Voices centers the volume where six authors pull at personal stories of dissent. Essays in this section include a critique of systemic poverty and the challenges of growing up poor, the complexities when religion and politics collide in the arena of women’s reproductive health, how Asian American identity is formed in relation to lesbian identity, nuclear family deconstructed through adoption, gender stereotyping among siblings, and the mail order bride industry. Closing Voices bookends the volume with an essay and book review. The essay interrogates ways female bodies are objectified in media, pageantry, and pornography. The book reviews question the gender double standard in Jessica Valenti’s Sex Object: A Memoir (20016), and He’s a Stud, She’s a Slut and 49 Other Double Standards Women Should Know (2008)...(Read more below).

All Voices

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Dissenting Voices Volume 6 Issue 1 (Spring 2017) Complete Issue
Women and Gender Studies Senior Seminar at The College at Brockport

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Our Voices
Melissa Brown, Julia DeGroff, Rachael Fort, Audrey Lai, becky luxon, Annette Maldonado, Maggie Rosen, Tambria Schroeder, Alise Tallents, Amber Wilk, and Kelsey Wright

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Note from the Editor
Barbara LeSavoy

Opening Voices

More Voices

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A Face of Poverty
Melissa Brown

Closing voices

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Photo Essays: WMS 421
Julia DeGroff

Editors

Executive Editor
Barbara LeSavoy, PhD, The College at Brockport
Managing Editor
Pat Maxwell, MLS, The College at Brockport
Copy Editor
Maggie Rosen WMS '17, The College at Brockport
Editorial Board
Tristan Bridges, PhD, The College at Brockport
Barbara Mitrano, EdD, The College at Brockport
Milo Obourn, PhD, The College at Brockport

Cover Art

Design by Mel Brown, WMS '18.
Calligraphy by Sara Connor, SOC, WMS '16.

The cover portrait is a photographic composite of one identity characteristic of each person in the WMS 421 Senior Seminar course. The abstract painting of vivid colors that frames the portrait represents the brilliant minds that have intertwined to create this volume. The use of different colors represents our diverse backgrounds, that when put together, become radiant. The hand print placed on the chest represents our extension to others and prompts readers to join us in the fight for social justice. The knuckles with the word “feminist” written in calligraphy are positioned on the back journal cover to leave readers with something other than a blank ending. This photographic composite is meant to create a new face of dissent.