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The Dynamics of Culture, Faith and Family among Hispanics

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The United States is currently one of the largest Spanish-speaking countries in the world. According to the Pew Research Center, the Hispanic population in the US will triple by 2050 becoming the largest Spanish-speaking country (Passel, J.S. & Cohn, D., 2008). Because one in five Americans will soon be foreign-born and their children and grandchildren will account for most of the population growth, it is imperative at we understand the dynamics that take place as these individuals and families adapt to the US culture. The process of adaptation and developing cultural competence in a new cultural setting may follow one of four different patterns: biculturalism, assimilation, separation or marginalization (Cabassa, L., 2003). These patterns become more complex for the children of immigrants and for children who migrated with their families to a new culture at a young age (Johnson-Mondragon, K., 2008). These generational differences are a major source of conflict within Hispanic families especially concerning ethnic identity, values and spirituality. Recognizing these patterns of acculturation is an important skill for anyone providing services to this diverse population.

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Sep 20th, 11:00 AM Sep 20th, 12:15 PM

The Dynamics of Culture, Faith and Family among Hispanics

The United States is currently one of the largest Spanish-speaking countries in the world. According to the Pew Research Center, the Hispanic population in the US will triple by 2050 becoming the largest Spanish-speaking country (Passel, J.S. & Cohn, D., 2008). Because one in five Americans will soon be foreign-born and their children and grandchildren will account for most of the population growth, it is imperative at we understand the dynamics that take place as these individuals and families adapt to the US culture. The process of adaptation and developing cultural competence in a new cultural setting may follow one of four different patterns: biculturalism, assimilation, separation or marginalization (Cabassa, L., 2003). These patterns become more complex for the children of immigrants and for children who migrated with their families to a new culture at a young age (Johnson-Mondragon, K., 2008). These generational differences are a major source of conflict within Hispanic families especially concerning ethnic identity, values and spirituality. Recognizing these patterns of acculturation is an important skill for anyone providing services to this diverse population.