The College at Brockport’s 13th Annual Diversity Conference

Click on the presentation name to read the abstract and presenter's bio.

Schedule

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2013
Thursday, September 19th
11:00 AM

Creating a Trans-Inclusive Campus

Megan Obourn, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Room 119

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Abstract: This session will look primarily at the question of how The College at Brockport and other US universities are creating transgender inclusive campuses for students, staff, and faculty. We will define practical lacks and solutions including gender-neutral housing and bathrooms, name changes, and healthcare. We will also look at issues such as language use in the classroom and the micro aggressions faced by transgender members of our campus. We will discuss which educational campaigns, initiatives, policies, and procedures are best practices for addressing gender identity and expression in the college environment and explore ways to create trans-inclusive change on our campus and beyond.

Presenter:

Megan Obourn is an assistant professor of English at The College at Brockport. She works on contemporary American literature and social identity theory. She also is on the Women and Gender Studies advisory board and the faculty advisor for SOUL and English Club. The title of her first book is Reconstituting Americans: Liberal Multiculturalism and Identity Difference in Post-1960s Literature.

Find Your Inner Peace

Yvonne Koketso Ferreira

Cooper Hall - New York Room

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Abstract: “Inner peace (or peace of mind) refers to a state of being mentally and spiritually at peace, with enough knowledge and understanding to keep oneself strong in the face of discord or stress. Being ‘at peace’ is considered by many to be healthy (homeostasis) and the opposite of being stressed or anxious. Peace of mind is generally associated with bliss, happiness and contentment. Peace of mind, serenity, and calmness are descriptions of a disposition free from the effects of stress. In some cultures, inner peace is considered a state of consciousness or enlightenment that may be cultivated by various forms of training, such as prayer, meditation, T’ai Chi Ch’uan or yoga, for example. Many spiritual practices refer to this peace as an experience of knowing oneself. Finding inner peace is often associated with traditions such as Hinduism and Buddhism.” Source: Wikipedia.

Using story, movement, music and drawing we will explore personal stories, locations to locate each participants “happy place,” as an inner retreat during stressful times.

Presenter:

Yvonne Koketso Ferreira is a teaching artist, storyteller and puppeteer. An alumna of The College at Brockport's Interdisciplinary Arts for Education Major, Ms. Ferreira began her arts career as the founder and master puppeteer of Gazelle Puppets & Tales in Kansas City, MO. Yvonne was an educator, teaching artist and a storyteller-in-residence for Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, FL. She is a three time Disney Teacheriffic Award winning Teaching Artist for Community Arts Programming. She has been telling stories since her youth, taught at her Trinidadian Nana’s knee. With Gazelle Tales International, her 33+ year old company, Yvonne performs Peace Tales from around the world.

Improving Health Equity through Partnership, Engagement, and Action

Shaquana Divers, University of Rochester Medical Center
Dina Faticone, Healthi Kids Initiative
Miguel Melendez

Hartwell Theatre

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Abstract: This session will describe how three local efforts: HEART, Healthi Kids, and Project HOPE are championing health access and equity through partnerships, community engagement and implementing policy and systems changes. Attendees will gain an understanding of the program goals for each of these initiatives, how they have worked together to achieve positive outcomes and key ways they are engaging the community to prevent chronic disease.

Presenters:

Shaquana Divers is a program manager for the Center for Community Health at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She has worked on a number of successful community based interventions in Baltimore, MD and Rochester, NY in the areas of obesity, physical activity, heart disease and cancer prevention.

Dina Faticone is the program manager for the Healthi Kids Initiative, a coalition working to prevent childhood overweight and obesity through public policy change. Prior to joining the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency in 2012, she spent more than 10 years working in the development field. Her passion for working closely with communities has led her to work in South Africa, South America, the Caribbean, and Washington, DC. Dina is a native of Rochester and holds a master’s degree in Sustainable Development from Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management.

Miguel Melendez is the coordinator of Project HOPE at Ibero-American Development Corporation and project director of the Rochester Drug Free Streets Initiative. He is experienced in community outreach, volunteer management, public policy and grants administration. Miguel holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from St. John Fisher College.

Promoting diversity across disciplines: Diversity and inclusion in action

Jie Zhang, The College at Brockport
Janka Szilagyi, The College at Brockport
Younkyeong Nam, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Ballroom West

11:00 AM - 12:15 PM

Abstract: Research has suggested that faculty characteristics, academic discipline, course characteristics, department perceptions, and institutional commitment to diversity are all strong indicators of diversity and inclusion (Milem, 2001; Mayhew & Grunwald, 2006; Smart & Umbach, 2007; Umbach, 2006; Braxton & Hargens, 1996; Laird, 2011). The presenters will report a review of the literature on evidence-based research on diversity. In addition, they will examine the diversity and inclusion in their own courses with the nine critical elements, composed of purpose/goals, content, foundations/perspectives, learners’ characteristics, instructors’ characteristics, pedagogy, classroom environment, assessment/evaluation, and adjustment of pace, content, or assignments based on students’ learning strengths and needs (Laird, 2011). The presenters will provide hands-on activities, interactive questions and answers, and opportunities for discussion to enhance the participants’ self-awareness and understanding of diversity and inclusion.

Presenters:

Dr. Jie Zhang, assistant professor in the Department of Education and Human Development at The College at Brockport since 2008, teaches special education courses. She also supervises student teachers and taught graduate thesis seminar. Her research interests are: exploring the cultural and linguistic factors in the services for children with diverse backgrounds/abilities and their families; and investigating the efficacy of different instructional methods on teaching and learning. Dr. Zhang’s passion is to work with children with diverse backgrounds and their teachers and parents/families to enhance the quality of their lives.

Dr. Janka Szilagyi, assistant professor in the Department of Education and Human Development at The College at Brockport, teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in elementary and middle level mathematics methodology, and educational research. Her research interests currently include developmental progressions in the learning of mathematical concepts, elementary and middle level mathematics teachers’ understanding of inquiry and a problem-based approach to learning and teaching, and the maintenance of the heritage language and culture in bilingual children.

Dr. Younkyeong Nam, assistant professor in the Department of Education and Human Development at The College at Brockport, teaches science methodology courses for elementary and secondary pre-service teachers. Her research interests are exploring science teachers’ beliefs, perceptions, practices of culturally relevant science teaching for students who have diverse cultural and language backgrounds, and socio-cultural aspects of diverse students’ conceptions and understandings of natural phenomena and science concepts.

12:45 PM

Cultural Showcase: Mr. Jimmie Highsmith Jr.

Jimmie Highsmith Jr.

Seymour Union - Ballroom

12:45 PM - 1:05 PM

Jimmie, or as friends call him, TJARI, was born September 18, 1967 in “Flower City” Rochester NY. Critically acclaimed, Grammy nominated and award winning Saxophonist Jimmie Highsmith Jr., has shared the stage with and opened for multiple Grammy Award winners, including Najee, Alicia Keys, Víctor and Joseph Wooten, Chris Botti, Grover Washington Jr., and Wynton Marsalis just to name a few. In the last ten years he has recorded 7 top selling smooth jazz CD’s that have sold thousands worldwide with his 6th CD "The Anthology of Sound" receiving a Grammy Nomination. Jimmie has also been honored to record with several other musicians, singers and rappers on their projects. Jimmie Highsmith Jr’s sax work represents some of the best in the Smooth Jazz Genre.

June 1st was proclaimed by then Mayor Robert J. Duffy "Jimmie Highsmith Jr Day" in Rochester NY.

1:05 PM

Cultural Showcase: The HIP HOP Dance Club

The HIP HOP DANCE Club (THHDC)

Seymour Union - Ballroom

1:05 PM - 1:20 PM

The HIP HOP DANCE Club (THHDC) was officially recognized by The Brockport Student Government at The College at Brockport on February 10, 2012. The club currently has 60 members, 25 of whom are active. The executive committee consists of founder and President: Nicson Martinez, Vice President: Stephen Ruck, Co-Vice President: Jennifer Robinson, Secretary: Margaret Moreno and Treasurer: Laura Vanzetta. One of THHDC's recent accomplishments was winning 1st place in the Cynergy Dance Competition at Daemen College on the 20th April, 2013.

1:20 PM

Cultural Showcase: The Story Teller: Gazelle Tales

Yvonne Koketso Ferreira

Seymour Union - Ballroom

1:20 PM - 1:35 PM

Originally from Queens, NY, Ms. Yvonne Ferreira is a Master Jaliva, (storyteller) who has been weaving folk tales enchanting audiences, young and old for over a quarter century on three continents, the Caribbean, and more than fifteen American States. She is a three time Disney Teacheriffic Award winning Teaching Artist and performed daily in the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, GA. Ms. Ferreira is currently touring her new hometown, Rochester NY, the nation and internationally spreading peace tales from around the world to foster diversity sensitivity, teaching tolerance and peaceful conflict resolution.

1:35 PM

Cultural Showcase: Sankofa

Sankofa

Seymour Union - Ballroom

1:35 PM - 2:00 PM

Sankofa is a symbolic, Ghanaian expression represented by a bird whose head turns back looking towards the past. The Sankofa African Dance and Drum Ensemble retrieves the cultural essences of the past and brings them into the present.The ensemble presents dance and theater works expressing the dynamic presence of African culture in America. Some of the presentations are replicas of traditional African prototypes; and some are re-creations, employing contemporary themes and movement motifs.

The members of the African Dance and Drum Ensemble of The College at Brockport represent the rich cultural heritage of Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, the Americas, and Africa that exists within our university community. Clyde Alafiju Morgan has been the artistic director since 1985. Music director Khalid Abdul N'Fally Saleem joined the ensemble in 1994.

2:00 PM

Creating Inclusive Spaces for Gender Variance

JC Acosta, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Room 119

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract: This workshop provides a brief overview of gender as a space of diversity and challenges participants to rethink the basic assumptions about gender variance. The pervasive understanding of gender in society is flawed and harmful to anyone whose sense of self does not match, especially those in the Trans* community. Gender as broadly understood is based on the assumption that appearance communicates a person’s biological sex and gender identity. Each of these elements of identity functions independently, to make up how a person interacts in the social world. Gender variant individuals challenge the accepted construction of gender and are forced to operate from the margins. Statistics show overwhelming numbers of Trans* individuals have reported workplace harassment and discrimination resulting in disproportionately high rates of homelessness, depression and suicide in the gender variant community. Gender identity and expression are not universally protected in the workplace, housing, and many educational spaces.

In this interactive workshop, participants will be given the tools to navigate the confusing language of gender and gender variance. We will explore new ways to conceptualize gender and place that within a space of action. The group will identify the structural barriers to inclusivity in their social environments and will propose ways to create open and affirming spaces. This workshop will be a combination of presentation and small group discussions. Participants will leave equipped to continue discussing gender purposefully and implement changes in their communities.

Presenter:

JC Acosta is currently a graduate student at The College at Brockport and co-facilitator of the Rochester Trans* Group. She has been an active member of the Trans* community since beginning her transition in 2009. JC has used her undergraduate background in Sociology and Women and Gender Studies from Brockport to actively engage in education and activism related to Trans* identities.

Diversity Camp

Victoria Ferraina, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Room 220

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract: Diversity Camp is a program that strives to educate adolescents about tolerance and acceptance of all people, regardless of race, nationality, social class, sexual orientation, religion, or level of physical or mental ability. During this session, participants will learn about the program and why it was created.

Presenter:

Victoria Ferraina earned her bachelor’s degree in Recreation and Leisure Studies and Health Science from The College at Brockport in 2013. She was a co-founder of Brockport Advocates for Individuals with Disabilities and vice president of the organization in her junior and senior years. It was her work with this organization that inspired her passion of advocating for and supporting diversity.

“Jagadamba” Act I

Yashodhara Maitra

Tower Fine Arts - Blackbox Theatre

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract: “Jagadamba” is a one-woman, two act play that traces Kasturba Ghandi’s (wife of Mahatma Ghandi) journey, from India to South Africa and back to India — a journey that breaks barriers of caste, race, religion and tradition, forcing her to examine her beliefs, and embrace change. It shows her development and growth, her strengths, and her handling of extraordinary situations. [*Please note — “Jagadamba” is a two-act play that will take place in afternoon educational sessions I and II.]

Presenter:

Yashodhara Maitra has been an educator of the deaf at the National Technical Institute of the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology for 20 years in the subjects of mathematics and the natural sciences. She is a professional translator and has translated works in the genre of biographies, fiction and plays. Her translated works have been published by Popular Prakashan, Street Books, Kolkata, The Sahitya Sakedemi, India, as well as the University of Waterloo Press, Canada.

Listen: Community Voices Have a Lot to Say about Health Disparities

Judith Bauman
Byron Kennedy, Monroe County Department of Public Health
Candice Lucas, Center for Community Health

Hartwell Theater

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract:

The Health Disparities Working Group (HDWG) is facilitated by Dr. Byron Kennedy and Candice Lucas with program support from Judith Bauman. HDWG is part of the Facing Race, Embracing Equity (FR=EE) Initiative, developed to advance community action in response to the exhibit "Race: Are We So Different?" at the Rochester Museum and Science Center. Rather than duplicating existing efforts, FR=EE’s Working Groups were explicitly designed to promote action through collaboration and meaningful community engagement. HDWG members asserted that it was crucial to establish mutually respectful relationships prior to engaging in the work itself. The absence of such a relationship between patient and provider was linked, in part, to deleterious health outcomes for people of color. Rather than use the term ‘cultural competence’ as an endpoint, HDWG members emphasized the importance of practicing ‘cultural humility as a means of engagement – both for individual provider/patient interactions and for public health efforts. The work of HDWG is ongoing and workshop participants are encouraged to become Champions of Access and Equity by becoming involved.

Presenters:

Judith Bauman is a community advocate, working with the FR=EE Initiative as a coordinator for the Health Disparities Working Group. Ms. Bauman has an extensive history of collaboration with communities of color in several health-related areas and currently serves as a representative on the African American and Latino Health Coalitions of the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency. She is deeply committed to social justice and practices cultural humility to promote thoughtful action toward mutually identified objectives.

Dr. Byron Kennedy is the director of the Monroe County Department of Public Health. Previously, Byron worked for the California Department of Public Health, the local health departments of Sacramento and San Francisco, CA, as well as at the California State Legislature on health policy issues, including a statewide community health initiative. Byron is Board Certified in Preventive Medicine and graduated from Yale University, where he received his MD, PhD, and Masters in Public Health (MPH) degrees, with doctoral training in epidemiology. He has published papers in the areas of chronic disease treatment, tobacco control, overuse injury, aging, and health disparities. He is an avid, year-round bicycle rider, enjoying both on-the-road and bike trail terrains.

Candace Lucas is the director of community health services at the URMC Center for Community Health. In this role, Lucas directs the operations of multiple community-based outreach programs aimed at improving the health status of Monroe County residents through the promotion of physical activity, nutrition, cancer screenings and healthy lifestyle workshops. Lucas also co-facilitates the Race and Health Disparities Working Group for the Facing Race=Embracing Equity Initiative.

Living in Vietnam: A Travelogue

Harriet Paterson, The College at Brockport

Cooper Hall - New York Room

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract:

This workshop will present an anecdotal travelogue on the experiences of a Brockport international student from the UK studying and living in Vietnam. The workshop’s goal is to expose participants to Vietnamese culture in an effort to dispel common misconceptions many Americans still hold in thinking of Vietnam through the prism of the Vietnam War. This workshop will highlight the presenter’s experiences of surviving in a new culture, examine how bridges were built in the community, and assess questions of gender equality in an effort to embrace and appreciate differences.

Presenter:

Harriet Paterson is a graduate student currently enrolled in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program with a focus on Women’s Studies. She received her BA from the University of Portsmouth, UK. Ms. Paterson lived in Vietnam for four months. The responses she received from students across campus when she told them she was going to be living in Vietnam motivated this workshop.

Racial Justice and Diversity, What’s the Difference?

Metro Justice Racial Justice Committee

Edwards 106

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract: Diversity is not enough. Fifty years after the Voting Rights Act, America is still a place where people of color continue to get the short end of the stick. How do our American institutions (schools, judicial system, housing, banking, health care) still deliver the same disparate outcomes as the Jim Crow era? Our president is black and our neighbors are less prejudiced, yet whether it’s home ownership, graduation rates, heart disease, employment or wages, white Americans continue to do much better than people of color. How is this possible? How is diversity different than racial justice? What is the relationship between diversity and institutional and structural racism? You’ll learn the answers to these questions and more at this session.

Presenter:

Presentation by the Metro Justice Racial Justice Committee

Terrorism and Ideological Offending in the US

Tibian Ahmed, The College at Brockport

Edwards 103

2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Abstract: Throughout her childhood, Tibian Ahmed has faced prejudice because of her religion. In this inspirational documentary, Tibian shares with us how this has affected her world view and how she's working to change that. It focuses on Muslims and the controversy raised by unfortunate events. This is a dynamic story told by young adults, as well as a US soldier, which showed inside stories of what people have endured since the attack of 9/11.

Presenter:

Tibian Ahmed is a freshman at The College at Brockport. She has worked with WNYC, Reel Works Teen Filmmaking, and MOUSE CORP to create a transmedia project on healthcare.

3:30 PM

Home is Where the Heart is

Brittany Profit-Reinbald

Seymour Union - Gallery

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: Just 20 years ago, the Merriam Webster Dictionary defined family as “One or two parents and their children who are a fundamental social group in society.” As times have changed so has the definition; today’s family is defined as, “A group of individuals living under one roof and usually under one head.”

“Home is Where the Heart is” has become a body of work inspired by my childhood. Primarily raised by my grandparents, I learned from an early age that the family unit isn’t always as it seems. I learned to accept diversity, or more importantly, not question it at all. I never thought twice about the possibility of my family life seeming “strange” to those on the outside; not once did I ever feel different or at a disadvantage from not being raised by my biological mother and father. In my mind, I was loved unconditionally and cared for with nothing but encouragement and support and that was all I could or would have ever needed.

It became very important to me to showcase today’s family unit and the array of diversity it holds. Throughout this photo series you will be introduced to families with single mothers, single fathers, same sex parents, grandparents raising grandchildren, families with adopted children, and blended families, as well as a traditional nuclear family, as I feel this type of home is quickly becoming extinct in today’s age, therefore tackling diversity in its own form.

Presenter:

Brittany Profit-Rheinbald was born and raised in Mansfield, OH and has resided in Rochester, NY since 2007. After a lengthy teaching career, she decided to follow her true passion and began studying art with a concentration in photography, earning a BS in Art with a concentration in Photography from The College at Brockport (2013). Brittany also received an associate’s degree from Monroe Community College in Adolescent Education (2011), a BA in Sports Psychology from the University of Tampa (2004) and a MS in Sports Psychology from The Ohio State University (2006). Brittany’s work focuses on family dynamics.

"I am a Person, Not a Disability": Acknowledging the Talents of Individuals with Disabilities and Debunking Stereotypes

Jessica James, The College at Brockport

Edwards 106

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: According to the ARC, an estimated 54 million Americans live with a disability. These people constitute the nation's largest and most diverse minority group. What sets this minority group apart from the others is that anyone can join at any time and it is the only group that is inclusive and accepting of anyone. Mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, neighbors, friends, co-workers, students and teachers all comprise this group and every ethnicity, socioeconomic background, religion, age, and gender is represented.

Even today, people who live with disabilities or impairments have been identified by their disability, instead of being identified as a person first. Words such as “retarded,” “handicapped,” “wheelchair bound,” “special-ed student,” and “disabled” are just a few examples deemed responsible for plaguing societal perceptions and acceptances of such individuals, in addition to contributing to the inclusion of these individuals. This is a result of lack of awareness and has caused society to fail to embrace the unique talents, skills, and abilities of these persons. People with disabilities or medical impairments are often labeled by their disability or means of mobility, instead of as a person first. This workshop will focus on disability awareness, eradicating negative stereotypes and perceptions of such persons, using person first terminology, and interacting properly and positively with a person who lives with a disability.

Presenter:

Jessica James is a second year transfer student here at The College at Brockport, pursuing her second baccalaureate degree in Criminal Justice. Prior to coming to Brockport in 2012, Miss James graduated with a BS degree in Individualized Studies from Buffalo State College. During Scholars Day 2013, she presented "People First Terminology: Changing Societal Perceptions of Individuals with Disabilities," inspired by her experiences as volunteer for the Brockport Empire State Games for the Physically Challenged, mentored by Dr. Lauren Lieberman.

“Jagadamba” Act II

Yashodhara Maitra

Tower Fine Arts - Blackbox Theatre

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: “Jagadamba” is a one-woman, two act play that traces Kasturba Ghandi’s (wife of Mahatma Ghandi) journey, from India to South Africa and back to India — a journey that breaks barriers of caste, race, religion and tradition, forcing her to examine her beliefs, and embrace change. It shows her development and growth, her strengths, and her handling of extraordinary situations. [*Please note — “Jagadamba” is a two-act play that will take place in afternoon educational sessions I and II.]

Presenter:

Yashodhara Maitra has been an educator of the deaf at the National Technical Institute of the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology for 20 years in the subjects of mathematics and the natural sciences. She is a professional translator and has translated works in the genre of biographies, fiction and plays. Her translated works have been published by Popular Prakashan, Street Books, Kolkata, The Sahitya Sakedemi, India, as well as the University of Waterloo Press, Canada.

Marriage Equality and Inequality: Beliefs that Foster, The Impact on LGBT Individuals, and Creating Change

Jennifer Ratcliff, The College at Brockport
Anne Tischer
Bess Watts, Monroe Community College

Seymour Union - Room 220

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: This workshop will explore the consequences and correlates of supporting inequality from the perspective of the heterosexual majority. Specifically, the constructs that foster resistance to support for marriage equality, and the relationship between such resistance and negative behavioral intentions toward LGBT individuals will be examined.

The Impact of Marriage Inequality (Bess Watts): Using real-life stories, this discussion examines the outcomes of unequal treatment of same-sex couples who were denied the 1138 Federal and/or 1324 NY State marriage protections attached to a civil marriage license. While legislative, executive, and judicial actions have mitigated some inequities, disparities remain that negatively affect same-sex couples, their families and society. The positive outcomes of full marriage equality are explored.

Creating Change for Marriage Equality (Anne Tischer): This part of the workshop examines the grassroots organizing steps used to effectively change the issue narrative, sway public opinion, and foster “political will” in the successful campaign for NY marriage equality in 2011.Rochester activism was recognized as instrumental in causing the first GOP State Senator to publicly support marriage equality and set the stage for ultimate success.

Presenters:

Jennifer Ratcliff is an assistant professor at The College at Brockport. She received her PhD in social psychology from Ohio University and completed postdoctoral training at Harvard University Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Ratcliff’s research program focuses on understanding the processes by which individuals develop and maintain both positive and negative attitudes toward marginalized out-groups. This work has been applied to understanding how to bring about positive relations between marginalized groups and majority groups in America (e.g., gay men and heterosexual individuals), as well as in Israel (e.g., Arab Israelis and Jewish Israelis).

Anne Tischer is a retired social services worker well known in Rochester for LGBT rights activism. In 2004, Anne and Bess Watts were the first same-sex couple to be refused a marriage license in Rochester. As front-page news, they married in a public act of civil disobedience. Founders of Equality Rochester and local chapters of Marriage Equality New York and Pride at Work AFL-CIO, they have been recognized by Empire State Pride Agenda, Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley, Metro Justice, Rochester Labor Council and Monroe County Legislature. They were Grand Marshals of the 2011 Rochester Pride Parade. Anne holds a BS in Health Science from The College at Brockport.

Bess Watts is president of Civil Service Employee Association Local 828 as well as founder of Pride at Work AFL-CIO, Rochester-Finger Lakes. She is on both the national executive board for Pride at Work and the executive board of Rochester Labor Council (RLC). A library technician at Monroe Community College (MCC), Bess successfully pursued domestic partner benefits for employees in 2004. Among many recognitions, she received the MCC Innovation of the Year award for initiating their Safe Zone project and the RLC Community Solidarity Award. In 2006, Bess and Anne Tischer legally wed in Canada after 12 years together.

Negotiating Sex and Gender Mediums Across Continents: Brockport, NY to Novgorod, Russia

Barbara LeSavoy, The College at Brockport
Ann Giralico-Pearlman, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Room 119

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: This workshop examines geographies of student engagement across two continents detailing a Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) course, linking women and gender studies (WGST) students and faculty at a State University in NY with WGST and linguistics students/faculty at a State University in Russia. The COIL course, Sex and Gender Across Cultures: Brockport, NY—Novgorod, Russia, integrated blended technologies in teaching sex/gender representations as understood in the US, Russia, and selected world cultures. Course topics considered sex and gender constructs as reproduced in the politics of work, family, religion, reproductive freedoms, and sexual identity. Course delivery formats included synchronous video-conferencing; asynchronous blogging; shared lecture-capture; and video-recorded, student-produced public service announcements where students in each country reported on a variety of course-specific WGST research topics. This workshop implements shifting geographies of technology and examines questions of gendered labor, economy, and disciplinary migration encountered within a COIL course. How intercultural exchange transformed the blended environment, and how COIL courses effectively engage student voices will be addressed. Ways electronic medium influenced student interaction and learning across continents will be emphasized.

Presenters:

Dr. Barbara LeSavoy is the director of Women and Gender Studies (WMS) at The College at Brockport. Her teaching, research, and publication areas include women’s global human rights, gender/popular culture, intersectionality/educational equity, and women’s stories as feminist standpoint. Dr. LeSavoy chairs Rochester—Novgorod Linkages Women’s Partnership and is lead faculty for SUNY’s NEH Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) project. Dr. LeSavoy chairs Rochester AAUW College University Partnership and the Biennial Seneca Falls Dialogues and is a founding member of the Greater Rochester Consortium of Women and Gender Studies Faculty. She is the recipient of Brockport’s 2012 – 2013 Academic Advising Award and Outstanding Service to Students Award.

Ann Giralico-Pearlman is an instructional design specialist for the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CELT) and an adjunct faculty member at The College at Brockport. As an instructional design specialist, she works with faculty/staff to develop or redesign courses for online, hybrid, and media enhanced instruction. In her role, she focuses on best-practice pedagogy and andragogy models, creating social interaction in virtual environments, and developing effective course delivery and assessments measures.

The Inclusivity Project

Sara Kelly, The College at Brockport
Daniela Bulos, The College at Brockport
Nayeri Jacobo, The College at Brockport
Kayla Accordino, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Room B116

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: The Inclusivity Project’s mission is to give students a voice about their campus experience. In particular, it focuses on: student support services, employment, health care, residential experience, education, and public safety. Project members include Kayla Accordino, Daniela Bulos, Nayeri Jacobo, Amie Zwecker, Nickole Wickham, Catherine O’Connor; Advisors: Sara Kelly and Kendra Cadogan. The Inclusivity Project session will engage participants in meaningful reflection and discussion related to the campus climate for ethnic minority students at Brockport. As part of the Gold Leadership Certificate Program, this project was developed by students to learn more about the student experience, provide a voice for all students, and identify ways to enhance the experience of all students.

This session will focus on what an inclusive campus looks and feels like, and why and how the project was developed. Moreover, the session will share how the survey instrument was created, how the project was implemented, how results were tabulated, etc. Lastly, the session will discuss ways to enhance the inclusivity of our campus as a result of the survey results.

Presenters:

Sara Kelly currently serves as the assistant director of Residential Life/Learning Communities at The College at Brockport. She earned her BA and MS Ed at The College at Brockport and is currently pursuing her PhD in Higher Education Administration at the University at Buffalo. As part of the Leadership Development Program, Sara serves as a co-advisor to a Gold Leadership Group, as well as an EOP Mentor and is one of the chairs of The Tunnel of Oppression.

Daniela Bulos is a junior at The College at Brockport, pursuing her bachelor’s degree in Psychology with a minor in Women and Gender Studies. She is a resident assistant, LAUNCH peer mentor, and member of the Association of Latino American Students. She is involved in the Leadership Development Program (LDP) and serves on the College’s Conduct Board.

Nayeri Jacobo is a senior at The College at Brockport, pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Computer Information Systems with a minor in Business and Graphic Design. She is a resident assistant, LAUNCH peer mentor, and president of the Association of Latino American Students. She is involved in the Leadership Development Program, assists with The Tunnel of Oppression and works for Technology Support Services as a user support specialist.

Kayla Accordino is a junior at The College at Brockport, pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance and Interdisciplinary Arts for Children. She is a resident assistant, member of the Student Dance Organization and is involved in the Leadership Development Program.

Why Tolerating Workplace Heterosexism Matters for Heterosexuals: Implications for Social Justice and Human Rights Advocacy

Trevor Gates, The College at Brockport

Seymour Union - Ballroom West

3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Abstract: Workplace discrimination against lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people is a significant and well-documented social welfare problem. The Williams Institute estimates that between 16 to 68% of LGB people report experiencing various types of employment discrimination (Badgett, Lau, Sears, & Ho, 2007). Because there are no universal protections for LGB workers in the United States in some jurisdictions they can be arbitrarily fired without recourse due to their sexual orientation identity. Even greater disparities are found in LGB communities of color and other socially marginalized identities (Appleby, 2001; Krieger, Williams, & Moss, 1997; McDermott, 2006; Oldfield, Candler, & Johnson, 2006).

Workplace discrimination against LGB workers affects the job-related affective well-being of both LGB and non-LGB workers alike; yet very little is known about the relationship between organizational tolerance for LGB workplace discrimination and the well-being of non-LGB, heterosexually-identified workers. Even less is known about the relationship between workplace discrimination against LGB workers and the job related affective well-being of non-LGB, heterosexual workers in the Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, New York regions.

During this interactive seminar, Dr. Gates will present the results of a cross-sectional study about perceptions of organizational tolerance for heterosexism among heterosexual workers in Western New York, and the relationship of organizational tolerance for heterosexism and workplace well being. Additionally, he will engage the audience in a larger discussion about workplace heterosexism and LGB workplace discrimination, including why workplace heterosexism matters from a human rights perspective.

Presenter:

Trevor G. Gates is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work at The College at Brockport. Dr. Gates is a clinical social worker and substance abuse counselor with more than 10 years of experience in Chicago and Dallas in community-based and hospital settings. His clinical specialty is practice with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. His current research focuses on social justice issues with LGBT communities, organizational behavior, and strengths-based practices. He is currently doing research on the impact of workplace stigma-related experiences on LGBT people and the correlation of organizational tolerance for heterosexism and workplace wellness.