The College at Brockport’s 14th Annual Diversity Conference

Hip Hop and Community: Dancing to Expand Racial and Economic Boundaries

Rodney Hill

Presenter:

Rodney Hill was born and raised in North Philadelphia and entered the hip-hop scene in 1988. Mr. Hill has taught in universities locally, nationally and internationally. In 2012 in conjunction with the US State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Urban Affairs and the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Rodney Hill & Rennie Harris Puremovement participated in the DanceMotion USA cultural exchange program. He is currently the company manager/director for Rennie Harris Puremovement and Rennie Harris RHAW. Mr. Hill seeks inspiration from his community while continuing to educate and inspire others through his hard work, dedication, and commitment to hip-hop and its culture.

Description

Hip Hop as an art embraces diversity and gives voice to each emergent generation. Evolving out of inner-city African American and Latino communities, Hip Hop inherently challenges boundaries based on race and economics. The Hip Hop movement logically developed out of a trajectory of expressive dance development as established by Break Dancers who creatively addressed oppression in the Bronx (1960s). Like Break Dancing, Hip Hop maintains its competitive edge in a way that is fruitful and celebratory, yet daring and political; it affirms the identity of the African American or Latino performer while also serving as a kind of “pedagogy of invitation,” (Analouise Keating, 2012), one in which the dancer invites “others” into his/her communal world of participation. In counterpoint, Hip Hop expanded the circle intrinsic to Break Dancing in a global way and evolved to become an expressive dynamic performance-exchange form embracing all cultures and ages.

Presenter Rodney Hill will discuss his childhood experience, growing up as an African-American inner-city Philadelphian and his journey from the streets to a professional Hip-Hop company. His presentation, including a video of Hip-Hop performances, demonstrates how hip-hop is an outlet for kids in his community. The session will discuss ways in which Hip Hop empowered African-American and Latino communities, to blur lines created by racial, religious, and economic boundaries, while also providing a celebratory spirit for today’s generation.

 
Oct 2nd, 11:00 AM Oct 2nd, 12:15 PM

Hip Hop and Community: Dancing to Expand Racial and Economic Boundaries

Hip Hop as an art embraces diversity and gives voice to each emergent generation. Evolving out of inner-city African American and Latino communities, Hip Hop inherently challenges boundaries based on race and economics. The Hip Hop movement logically developed out of a trajectory of expressive dance development as established by Break Dancers who creatively addressed oppression in the Bronx (1960s). Like Break Dancing, Hip Hop maintains its competitive edge in a way that is fruitful and celebratory, yet daring and political; it affirms the identity of the African American or Latino performer while also serving as a kind of “pedagogy of invitation,” (Analouise Keating, 2012), one in which the dancer invites “others” into his/her communal world of participation. In counterpoint, Hip Hop expanded the circle intrinsic to Break Dancing in a global way and evolved to become an expressive dynamic performance-exchange form embracing all cultures and ages.

Presenter Rodney Hill will discuss his childhood experience, growing up as an African-American inner-city Philadelphian and his journey from the streets to a professional Hip-Hop company. His presentation, including a video of Hip-Hop performances, demonstrates how hip-hop is an outlet for kids in his community. The session will discuss ways in which Hip Hop empowered African-American and Latino communities, to blur lines created by racial, religious, and economic boundaries, while also providing a celebratory spirit for today’s generation.