Publication Date

2005

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Department

Counselor Education

Abstract

Academic intrinsic motivation is a key factor in academic performance and achievement. Many students, for various reasons, have minimal motivation for school evidenced by little persistence and little effort expended at school. This investigation examined the effect of counseling on academic motivation and achievement. Participants were seven 7th and 8th grade middle school students who were identified as students who lacked motivation. The Children’s Academic Intrinsic Motivation Inventory (CAIMI) (Gottfried, 1986) was used to confirm that motivation was an issue for student participants. Each student completed a minimum of 11 counseling sessions over a 13-week research period. Results for each student are reported. Support was found for the hypothesis that motivation and self-efficacy would increase through the counseling process and as a result, grades, and in some instances attendance, would improve. Limitations of the study are discussed and suggestions for the direction of school counseling programs are presented.

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