Program

Event Title

Ecosystem Scale Impacts of Simulated Emerald Ash Borer in Western New York Forest

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive pest from Asia that has recently become established in localized areas of Western New York (WNY). This pest, first discovered in Michigan in 2002, may kill more than 85% of ash (Fraxinus) trees in a stand within 3-5 years of establishment. Therefore, the potential for dramatic community and ecosystem change exists following the establishment of this pest. Despite the damage inflicted by EAB, few ecological studies of the impact of this pest exist beyond Fraxinus population dynamics. However, it is likely that this pest will drastically change ecosystem functioning in infested stands. Stands with simulated EAB mortality are being compared to adjacent uninfested control stands with the goal of filling this information gap on the broader impacts of EAB. This is especially important in WNY where ash are a major forest contributor. It is hypothesized that ash-dominated sites, which are currently atmospheric carbon sinks, will become carbon sources due to declines in production and increased decomposition associated with the loss of ash and shifts in microclimate. It is also hypothesized that this pest will set back the successional clock of infested sites, shifting the community toward an early successional community with an increased presence of nonnative plants.

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

Comments

Biology | Biotechnology | Environmental Sciences Poster presentation

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM

Ecosystem Scale Impacts of Simulated Emerald Ash Borer in Western New York Forest

Edwards Hall Lobby

The emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive pest from Asia that has recently become established in localized areas of Western New York (WNY). This pest, first discovered in Michigan in 2002, may kill more than 85% of ash (Fraxinus) trees in a stand within 3-5 years of establishment. Therefore, the potential for dramatic community and ecosystem change exists following the establishment of this pest. Despite the damage inflicted by EAB, few ecological studies of the impact of this pest exist beyond Fraxinus population dynamics. However, it is likely that this pest will drastically change ecosystem functioning in infested stands. Stands with simulated EAB mortality are being compared to adjacent uninfested control stands with the goal of filling this information gap on the broader impacts of EAB. This is especially important in WNY where ash are a major forest contributor. It is hypothesized that ash-dominated sites, which are currently atmospheric carbon sinks, will become carbon sources due to declines in production and increased decomposition associated with the loss of ash and shifts in microclimate. It is also hypothesized that this pest will set back the successional clock of infested sites, shifting the community toward an early successional community with an increased presence of nonnative plants.