Program

Event Title

Is There Evidence to Support the use of Multi-sensory Interventions that Reduce Negative Behaviors Displayed by Patients with Dementia?

Location

218 Hartwell

Description

This PowerPoint presentation will describe a project seeking evidence to support the focused question: “Is there evidence to support the use of multi-sensory interventions that reduce negative behaviors displayed by patients with dementia?” Sensory integration initially focused on children with learning disabilities with difficulty interpreting sensory information from their bodies and the environment (Kielhofner, 2009). This model has since expanded to be used throughout the lifespan, such as with the elderly population. Dementia is a prevalent disease among the elderly population and many of these individuals diagnosed with dementia may display negative behaviors to themselves or to others. These negative behaviors can include swearing, hitting, scratching, biting, and pulling hair. Primary treatment includes medication, which can have compromising quality of life side effects. Medication will continue to be primary treatment, but there is an increase in research focusing on the effects of nonpharmacological interventions/multi-sensory interventions such as music, light, pet, aroma and craniosacral therapies as well as the use of multi-sensory environments/rooms. This evidence review will explore the efficacy of sensory interventions for patients with dementia who are demonstrating negative behaviors. Results of the initial evidence review provides evidence for the use of multi-sensory environments to reduce negative behaviors and can improve the quality of life for patients with dementia.

Start Date

20-4-2013 9:00 AM

Comments

Occupational Therapy panel

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Apr 20th, 9:00 AM

Is There Evidence to Support the use of Multi-sensory Interventions that Reduce Negative Behaviors Displayed by Patients with Dementia?

218 Hartwell

This PowerPoint presentation will describe a project seeking evidence to support the focused question: “Is there evidence to support the use of multi-sensory interventions that reduce negative behaviors displayed by patients with dementia?” Sensory integration initially focused on children with learning disabilities with difficulty interpreting sensory information from their bodies and the environment (Kielhofner, 2009). This model has since expanded to be used throughout the lifespan, such as with the elderly population. Dementia is a prevalent disease among the elderly population and many of these individuals diagnosed with dementia may display negative behaviors to themselves or to others. These negative behaviors can include swearing, hitting, scratching, biting, and pulling hair. Primary treatment includes medication, which can have compromising quality of life side effects. Medication will continue to be primary treatment, but there is an increase in research focusing on the effects of nonpharmacological interventions/multi-sensory interventions such as music, light, pet, aroma and craniosacral therapies as well as the use of multi-sensory environments/rooms. This evidence review will explore the efficacy of sensory interventions for patients with dementia who are demonstrating negative behaviors. Results of the initial evidence review provides evidence for the use of multi-sensory environments to reduce negative behaviors and can improve the quality of life for patients with dementia.