Program

Presenter Information

Margaret Lapp, SUNY ESFFollow

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

This presentation investigates the unprecedented number of older adults, namely the Baby Boomer generation, who are entering retirement. The need for aging ready communities is omnipresent. Seniors' desire to age in place supports this scale defiant exigency. Barriers to aging in place are ubiquitous; urban, suburban and rural communities demand solutions to threatening obstacles. Absence of a comprehensive aging-readiness plan necessitates action. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to aging in place in Central New York, and propose appropriate planning solutions. Focus groups were conducted to determine the barriers to aging in place. Three main themes arose: area for physical activity and exercise facilities is a priority, feeling of safety/security affects going out, and loss of control leads to compromised independence. Basis for intervention involved the following community context breakdown: property/grounds, house/building, street, block and neighborhood. Each theme was addressed via multi-generational planning, smart growth, universal and ecological design principles.

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:30 AM

Comments

Landscape Architecture Poster Presentation

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Challenging the Cognitive and Physical Reserve of Aging Adults Through the Development of a Central New York Aging Readiness Plan

Edwards Hall Lobby

This presentation investigates the unprecedented number of older adults, namely the Baby Boomer generation, who are entering retirement. The need for aging ready communities is omnipresent. Seniors' desire to age in place supports this scale defiant exigency. Barriers to aging in place are ubiquitous; urban, suburban and rural communities demand solutions to threatening obstacles. Absence of a comprehensive aging-readiness plan necessitates action. The purpose of this study was to identify the barriers to aging in place in Central New York, and propose appropriate planning solutions. Focus groups were conducted to determine the barriers to aging in place. Three main themes arose: area for physical activity and exercise facilities is a priority, feeling of safety/security affects going out, and loss of control leads to compromised independence. Basis for intervention involved the following community context breakdown: property/grounds, house/building, street, block and neighborhood. Each theme was addressed via multi-generational planning, smart growth, universal and ecological design principles.