Program

Event Title

Perinatal Mood Disorders: Voices of African American and Latina Women

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

Although there is an abundance of research on women’s needs and experiences with Perinatal Mood Disorders (PMD) and subsequent treatment interventions, there is a paucity of research focusing on African American and Latina mothers. This study partnered with three urban health centers to engage with African American and Latina women. The purpose of these interviews was to obtain first-hand accounts of mothers’ experiences with PMD and to discover what kinds of services and supports they found useful. Inquiry also covered the following areas; what women want service providers to know, what services and support they would like to have access to, and what does not or has not worked. Data was collected from three locations in low-income areas with an expected sample size n=12, via in person interviews and focus groups. Participants met the following requirements: currently pregnant or up to two years postpartum, identify as African American or Latina, and patients of one of the three urban health centers. An open coding process was used to identify major themes. We anticipate that African American and Latina women will report limited or unsatisfactory experiences with medical and mental health services related to PMD. This research is meaningful to social work because it contributes to a greater understanding of the experiences and emotional needs of women of color during pregnancy and beyond.

Start Date

20-4-2013 10:30 AM

Comments

Social Work Poster Session

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 10:30 AM

Perinatal Mood Disorders: Voices of African American and Latina Women

Edwards Hall Lobby

Although there is an abundance of research on women’s needs and experiences with Perinatal Mood Disorders (PMD) and subsequent treatment interventions, there is a paucity of research focusing on African American and Latina mothers. This study partnered with three urban health centers to engage with African American and Latina women. The purpose of these interviews was to obtain first-hand accounts of mothers’ experiences with PMD and to discover what kinds of services and supports they found useful. Inquiry also covered the following areas; what women want service providers to know, what services and support they would like to have access to, and what does not or has not worked. Data was collected from three locations in low-income areas with an expected sample size n=12, via in person interviews and focus groups. Participants met the following requirements: currently pregnant or up to two years postpartum, identify as African American or Latina, and patients of one of the three urban health centers. An open coding process was used to identify major themes. We anticipate that African American and Latina women will report limited or unsatisfactory experiences with medical and mental health services related to PMD. This research is meaningful to social work because it contributes to a greater understanding of the experiences and emotional needs of women of color during pregnancy and beyond.