Program

Event Title

Intimate Partner Violence Among College Students: Examining Likelihood of Intervention in Various Violent Scenarios

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

In the context of intimate partner violence (IPV), college students encounter a number of barriers when seeking help, including embarrassment, fear of not being believed, fear of being blamed, or fear of retaliation by the perpetrator (Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000). It has become increasingly important to recognize the role of bystanders in cases of IPV on college campuses. Although Banyard and Moynihan (2011) have investigated bystander intervention among this population, much remains unknown about how bystanders differentially respond across various instances of IPV (physical, sexual, and psychological violence). The current study investigated the likelihood of bystander intervention across these three different forms of IPV among a sample of 304 college students at two affiliated private colleges in northern New York. Specifically, the study examined whether bystander intervention differed by types of IPV, and by sex. To assess individuals’ likelihood to perform bystander behaviors in various IPV situations, a three-item scale was adapted from Nicksa’s (2011) vignette that provided three scenarios depicting psychological, physical, and sexual IPV. Participants reported more willingness to intervene in instances involving cases of physical and sexual IPV, when compared to emotional IPV. Female participants were more likely than males to intervene in instances of physical and emotional IPV. Strategies of intervention across all forms of IPV most often reported by participants, involved causing distraction, providing emotional support, and asking a friend for assistance. Implications and future directions for both the development and implementation of campus programming and recommendations for future research will be presented.

Start Date

20-4-2013 1:45 PM

Comments

Counseling Poster Session

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Apr 20th, 1:45 PM

Intimate Partner Violence Among College Students: Examining Likelihood of Intervention in Various Violent Scenarios

Edwards Hall Lobby

In the context of intimate partner violence (IPV), college students encounter a number of barriers when seeking help, including embarrassment, fear of not being believed, fear of being blamed, or fear of retaliation by the perpetrator (Fisher, Cullen, & Turner, 2000). It has become increasingly important to recognize the role of bystanders in cases of IPV on college campuses. Although Banyard and Moynihan (2011) have investigated bystander intervention among this population, much remains unknown about how bystanders differentially respond across various instances of IPV (physical, sexual, and psychological violence). The current study investigated the likelihood of bystander intervention across these three different forms of IPV among a sample of 304 college students at two affiliated private colleges in northern New York. Specifically, the study examined whether bystander intervention differed by types of IPV, and by sex. To assess individuals’ likelihood to perform bystander behaviors in various IPV situations, a three-item scale was adapted from Nicksa’s (2011) vignette that provided three scenarios depicting psychological, physical, and sexual IPV. Participants reported more willingness to intervene in instances involving cases of physical and sexual IPV, when compared to emotional IPV. Female participants were more likely than males to intervene in instances of physical and emotional IPV. Strategies of intervention across all forms of IPV most often reported by participants, involved causing distraction, providing emotional support, and asking a friend for assistance. Implications and future directions for both the development and implementation of campus programming and recommendations for future research will be presented.