Event Title

Hunting Children and Animals in The Hunger Games: It’s All Fun and Games

Location

Edwards 103

Document Type

Oral/PowerPoint Presentation (10 minutes and 5 minute Q and A)

Description

The College at Brockport Master’s Level Graduate Research Conference

April 26, 2014

April A. Daniels

Department of English

The College at Brockport

Hunting Children and Animals in The Hunger Games: It’s All Fun and Games

When Katniss Everdeen is chosen to fight to the death in the arena in the 2012 film The Hunger Games, she naturally fears for her life. She will, after all, be hunted by her fellow tributes—her fellow humans—and probably killed like the animals she kills for food. The last person she sees before being forcibly taken to the Capitol to compete in the Games is her best friend and hunting partner Gale, who assures her that she can win because she knows how to hunt. She stresses that she knows how to hunt animals, not humans, to which Gale responds, “It’s no different.” By analyzing key scenes in the films The Hunger Games and its sequel The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, this essay illustrates the ways in which these two films represent the relationship between the killing of humans and the killing of animals. A primary issue to be parsed is why both the films’ characters and viewers are horrified by the hunting and killing of humans, but not by the hunting and killing of animals. Society’s treatment of animals has been compared to both slavery and the Holocaust, and drawing on the scholarship of such as Jacques Derrida, Peter Singer, and David Ingram, this essay explores the representation of the ethical dilemma surrounding the hunting of animals in The Hunger Games film franchise. If The Hunger Games is an exposé on war, then the exposé includes the war on animals.

Start Date

April 2014

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Apr 26th, 2:40 PM

Hunting Children and Animals in The Hunger Games: It’s All Fun and Games

Edwards 103

The College at Brockport Master’s Level Graduate Research Conference

April 26, 2014

April A. Daniels

Department of English

The College at Brockport

Hunting Children and Animals in The Hunger Games: It’s All Fun and Games

When Katniss Everdeen is chosen to fight to the death in the arena in the 2012 film The Hunger Games, she naturally fears for her life. She will, after all, be hunted by her fellow tributes—her fellow humans—and probably killed like the animals she kills for food. The last person she sees before being forcibly taken to the Capitol to compete in the Games is her best friend and hunting partner Gale, who assures her that she can win because she knows how to hunt. She stresses that she knows how to hunt animals, not humans, to which Gale responds, “It’s no different.” By analyzing key scenes in the films The Hunger Games and its sequel The Hunger Games: Catching Fire, this essay illustrates the ways in which these two films represent the relationship between the killing of humans and the killing of animals. A primary issue to be parsed is why both the films’ characters and viewers are horrified by the hunting and killing of humans, but not by the hunting and killing of animals. Society’s treatment of animals has been compared to both slavery and the Holocaust, and drawing on the scholarship of such as Jacques Derrida, Peter Singer, and David Ingram, this essay explores the representation of the ethical dilemma surrounding the hunting of animals in The Hunger Games film franchise. If The Hunger Games is an exposé on war, then the exposé includes the war on animals.