Female Survivors of Prostitution: Success or Failure of Rehabilitative Programs

Denise R. Nigro, SUNY Empire State College

Description

Female Survivors of Prostitution: Success or Failure of Rehabilitative Programs

Denise Nigro, Social Policy

Research Advisor: Dr. Margaret Tally

Due to high recidivism rates, short-term rehabilitative success, and negative impact upon the children of female survivors of prostitution and the adult industry, this presentation will seek to answer the following: do female survivors of prostitution and the adult industry experience success or failure due to available rehabilitative programs as they transition out of the adult industry, and what impact does this transition have upon their children? Data will be presented of current rehabilitative programs, social welfare programs, social biases, recidivism rates, and alternative programs and methods to measure and effect success, focusing on long-term successful transition and positive impact upon their children. It concludes that current rehabilitative programs are not conducive to long-term successful rehabilitation with an elevated risk of recidivism and grave impact upon their children.

KEYWORDS: prostitution, human trafficking, rehabilitation, transition, recidivism

 
Apr 26th, 10:10 AM

Female Survivors of Prostitution: Success or Failure of Rehabilitative Programs

Edwards 103

Female Survivors of Prostitution: Success or Failure of Rehabilitative Programs

Denise Nigro, Social Policy

Research Advisor: Dr. Margaret Tally

Due to high recidivism rates, short-term rehabilitative success, and negative impact upon the children of female survivors of prostitution and the adult industry, this presentation will seek to answer the following: do female survivors of prostitution and the adult industry experience success or failure due to available rehabilitative programs as they transition out of the adult industry, and what impact does this transition have upon their children? Data will be presented of current rehabilitative programs, social welfare programs, social biases, recidivism rates, and alternative programs and methods to measure and effect success, focusing on long-term successful transition and positive impact upon their children. It concludes that current rehabilitative programs are not conducive to long-term successful rehabilitation with an elevated risk of recidivism and grave impact upon their children.

KEYWORDS: prostitution, human trafficking, rehabilitation, transition, recidivism