Event Title

Posttraumatic Relationship Syndrome: A review

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

Violence against women is a significant social and public health problem in the United States. Posttraumatic Relationship Syndrome (PTRS) is commonly referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research suggests that as many as 22% to 29% of women report histories of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). Furthermore, IPV remains the leading cause of injuries to women with a cost exceeding 5.58 billion dollars annually (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2003). Historically, men have controlled women by oppressing them sexually, socially and physically. This oppression continues in the present day. In this paper, the biopsychosocial consequences of women experiencing PTRS will be explored. Social policies, societal acceptance and cultural beliefs about abuse against women will be reviewed. The DSM V does not currently have a category for symptoms solely based on PTRS. The paper will advocate for the addition of PTRS in future DSMS.

Key words: Posttraumatic relationship syndrome, Intimate partner violence, domestic violence, battered women and violence against women

Start Date

April 2014

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Apr 26th, 2:10 PM

Posttraumatic Relationship Syndrome: A review

Edwards Hall Lobby

Violence against women is a significant social and public health problem in the United States. Posttraumatic Relationship Syndrome (PTRS) is commonly referred to as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research suggests that as many as 22% to 29% of women report histories of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). Furthermore, IPV remains the leading cause of injuries to women with a cost exceeding 5.58 billion dollars annually (National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2003). Historically, men have controlled women by oppressing them sexually, socially and physically. This oppression continues in the present day. In this paper, the biopsychosocial consequences of women experiencing PTRS will be explored. Social policies, societal acceptance and cultural beliefs about abuse against women will be reviewed. The DSM V does not currently have a category for symptoms solely based on PTRS. The paper will advocate for the addition of PTRS in future DSMS.

Key words: Posttraumatic relationship syndrome, Intimate partner violence, domestic violence, battered women and violence against women