Event Title

Grit, the Experience of Stress, and the Development of Depression

Presenter Information

Catherine AccorsoFollow

Location

Edwards 106

Document Type

Oral/PowerPoint Presentation (10 minutes and 5 minute Q and A)

Description

This study will be conducted in order to analyze the relationship between grit and depressogenic symptomology after completion of a stress induction task. It is hypothesized that those with higher levels of grit will endorse fewer cognitive distortions after the experience of stress. Approximately 100 participants will be recruited from an Introductory Psychology class at the College at Brockport State University of New York. Participants will be assigned to either the experimental or control condition. Both conditions will be measured for level of grit at the pretest phase. The experimental condition will complete a stress induction task. At posttest, both conditions will be provided with self-report measures. The collected data will analyze grit scores in conjunction with levels of cognitive distortions existent after the experimental manipulation. Multiple regression analyses will be used to examine the relationships between variables in this study. It is expected that those participants scoring higher on the grit measure will endorse fewer posttest cognitive distortions than those with lower scores. The findings of this study will have important clinical significance by providing information relevant to the development of more effective treatment methods for depression and to the formulation of preventative techniques.

Start Date

April 2014

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Apr 26th, 10:50 AM

Grit, the Experience of Stress, and the Development of Depression

Edwards 106

This study will be conducted in order to analyze the relationship between grit and depressogenic symptomology after completion of a stress induction task. It is hypothesized that those with higher levels of grit will endorse fewer cognitive distortions after the experience of stress. Approximately 100 participants will be recruited from an Introductory Psychology class at the College at Brockport State University of New York. Participants will be assigned to either the experimental or control condition. Both conditions will be measured for level of grit at the pretest phase. The experimental condition will complete a stress induction task. At posttest, both conditions will be provided with self-report measures. The collected data will analyze grit scores in conjunction with levels of cognitive distortions existent after the experimental manipulation. Multiple regression analyses will be used to examine the relationships between variables in this study. It is expected that those participants scoring higher on the grit measure will endorse fewer posttest cognitive distortions than those with lower scores. The findings of this study will have important clinical significance by providing information relevant to the development of more effective treatment methods for depression and to the formulation of preventative techniques.