Event Title

Social media’s effect on adolescents at risk of having an eating disorder.

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

According to National Institute of Health (n.d.), less than 30 percent of Americans are at a healthy weight based on their Body Mass Index. Media and social media in the United States have put an unrealistic perception of what is considered to be an appropriate weight, size, and body image. From these perceptions and other factors, adolescent eating disorders have become a prevalent part of society. It is currently estimated that between 1 percent and 4 percent of adolescents could meet the criteria for either of the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa (Allen, Oddy, Byrne, and Crosby, 2013). For those who are diagnosed, treatment and options to obtain treatment are scarce at best. This poster explores the impact of media and social media on adolescents who are at risk for or who have already developed an eating disorder. Implications for social work are also discussed including future recommendations for changes in treatment and preventative actions for clients at risk of eating disorders.

Start Date

April 2014

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Apr 26th, 2:10 PM

Social media’s effect on adolescents at risk of having an eating disorder.

Edwards Hall Lobby

According to National Institute of Health (n.d.), less than 30 percent of Americans are at a healthy weight based on their Body Mass Index. Media and social media in the United States have put an unrealistic perception of what is considered to be an appropriate weight, size, and body image. From these perceptions and other factors, adolescent eating disorders have become a prevalent part of society. It is currently estimated that between 1 percent and 4 percent of adolescents could meet the criteria for either of the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa (Allen, Oddy, Byrne, and Crosby, 2013). For those who are diagnosed, treatment and options to obtain treatment are scarce at best. This poster explores the impact of media and social media on adolescents who are at risk for or who have already developed an eating disorder. Implications for social work are also discussed including future recommendations for changes in treatment and preventative actions for clients at risk of eating disorders.