Preparation of Ni-Sn Nanorods with Composition Gradient, and Its Effect on Li-ion Battery Anode Performance

Ridwanur R. Chowdhury, University of Rochester

Description

The development of secondary Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high capacity, fast charge/discharge rates and long cycle life is indispensable for the advancement of high power portable devices, implantable medical devices, and plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles. Novel anode materials that offer higher specific capacity than that of conventional carbon-based materials are considered a key factor in this development. Nickel-Tin (Ni-Sn) alloy is a potential candidate for a novel anode material since Sn has high theoretical specific capacity, low cost, high abidance and high electrical conductivity. In addition, lithium- inactive Ni acts as a matrix to buffer the volume expansion during the electrochemical reaction of Sn with lithium (Li). However, the mechanism and the effect of this Ni matrix are not fully understood. This presentation focuses on understanding the Ni’s buffering effect by generating a stress gradient within the structure. This is accomplished by changing the Ni/Sn composition ratio of the nanorod along its length. The presentation includes fabricating nanorod arrays, as well as characterizing their physical properties and electrochemical performance in order to assess their capability as anode material.

 
Apr 26th, 10:10 AM

Preparation of Ni-Sn Nanorods with Composition Gradient, and Its Effect on Li-ion Battery Anode Performance

Edwards 106A

The development of secondary Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with high capacity, fast charge/discharge rates and long cycle life is indispensable for the advancement of high power portable devices, implantable medical devices, and plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles. Novel anode materials that offer higher specific capacity than that of conventional carbon-based materials are considered a key factor in this development. Nickel-Tin (Ni-Sn) alloy is a potential candidate for a novel anode material since Sn has high theoretical specific capacity, low cost, high abidance and high electrical conductivity. In addition, lithium- inactive Ni acts as a matrix to buffer the volume expansion during the electrochemical reaction of Sn with lithium (Li). However, the mechanism and the effect of this Ni matrix are not fully understood. This presentation focuses on understanding the Ni’s buffering effect by generating a stress gradient within the structure. This is accomplished by changing the Ni/Sn composition ratio of the nanorod along its length. The presentation includes fabricating nanorod arrays, as well as characterizing their physical properties and electrochemical performance in order to assess their capability as anode material.