Event Title

The Impact of Complex Interpersonal Trauma on Children and the Need for a Developmentally Appropriate Diagnosis

Presenter Information

Catharine Henderson, BrockportFollow

Location

Edwards Hall Lobby

Document Type

Poster Presentation (1 hour)

Description

This paper examines complex interpersonal trauma in children. Complex interpersonal trauma can refer to child physical, emotional and sexual abuse or neglect, and is typically perpetrated by an adult or family member close to the child. Studies have shown that children that experience complex trauma, may exhibit a unique constellation of symptoms that are not fully accounted for by any current DSM 5 diagnosis. Because of this, children are often misdiagnosed, over diagnosed, given medications, and not provided with proper treatments that address trauma. The diagnosis of Developmental Trauma Disorder, which has been proposed by Bessel van der Kolk (2005) and colleagues, would provide a lens for which traumatized children, caregivers, medical doctors, service providers and clinicians would be able to better understand the impact of trauma on a developing child.

Start Date

April 2014

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Apr 26th, 1:00 PM

The Impact of Complex Interpersonal Trauma on Children and the Need for a Developmentally Appropriate Diagnosis

Edwards Hall Lobby

This paper examines complex interpersonal trauma in children. Complex interpersonal trauma can refer to child physical, emotional and sexual abuse or neglect, and is typically perpetrated by an adult or family member close to the child. Studies have shown that children that experience complex trauma, may exhibit a unique constellation of symptoms that are not fully accounted for by any current DSM 5 diagnosis. Because of this, children are often misdiagnosed, over diagnosed, given medications, and not provided with proper treatments that address trauma. The diagnosis of Developmental Trauma Disorder, which has been proposed by Bessel van der Kolk (2005) and colleagues, would provide a lens for which traumatized children, caregivers, medical doctors, service providers and clinicians would be able to better understand the impact of trauma on a developing child.