Has the Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community in Southwestern Lake Ontario Changed since the Round Goby (Neogobius melanstomus) Invasion?

Katherine L. Bailey

Description

This presentation introduces a thesis proposal that focuses on evaluating changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities at a natural cobble site and artificial reef habitat following invasion of zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) and the exotic round goby. Situated near Olcott, NY, the natural cobble site and artificial reef have been sampled since 1983 (7 years pre-Dreissena), with subsequent sampling in 1991-1992, 1995, and 1999-2000. Fourteen years have elapsed since the last sampling event; anticipated sampling in 2014 will investigate round goby and Dreissena abundance, as well as native invertebrate and fish abundances and diversity. Past data analyses at these sites showed mixed responses of native invertebrates to Dreissena spp. colonization; from 1983 to 1999-2000, 5 of 11 invertebrate taxa more than doubled and 6 decreased by more than 50% at the cobble site while gastropods more than doubled and chironomids decreased by more than 50% at the reef habitat. The objectives of this project include collecting replicate samples of invertebrates along one 30-m transect at each site and quantifying round goby abundance using underwater video recording. Statistical comparisons will be conducted across years, months, and habitats using ANOVA and t-tests. Multivariate techniques will be utilized for analyzing the large dataset. The main goals of monitoring these habitats are two-fold: 1) to predict likely future impacts of aquatic invasive species and 2) to improve understanding of the population trends and threats to key aquatic populations.

 
Apr 26th, 2:20 PM

Has the Benthic Macroinvertebrate Community in Southwestern Lake Ontario Changed since the Round Goby (Neogobius melanstomus) Invasion?

Edwards 105

This presentation introduces a thesis proposal that focuses on evaluating changes in benthic macroinvertebrate communities at a natural cobble site and artificial reef habitat following invasion of zebra and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) and the exotic round goby. Situated near Olcott, NY, the natural cobble site and artificial reef have been sampled since 1983 (7 years pre-Dreissena), with subsequent sampling in 1991-1992, 1995, and 1999-2000. Fourteen years have elapsed since the last sampling event; anticipated sampling in 2014 will investigate round goby and Dreissena abundance, as well as native invertebrate and fish abundances and diversity. Past data analyses at these sites showed mixed responses of native invertebrates to Dreissena spp. colonization; from 1983 to 1999-2000, 5 of 11 invertebrate taxa more than doubled and 6 decreased by more than 50% at the cobble site while gastropods more than doubled and chironomids decreased by more than 50% at the reef habitat. The objectives of this project include collecting replicate samples of invertebrates along one 30-m transect at each site and quantifying round goby abundance using underwater video recording. Statistical comparisons will be conducted across years, months, and habitats using ANOVA and t-tests. Multivariate techniques will be utilized for analyzing the large dataset. The main goals of monitoring these habitats are two-fold: 1) to predict likely future impacts of aquatic invasive species and 2) to improve understanding of the population trends and threats to key aquatic populations.