Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Publication Date

8-6-1992

Abstract

Kinesiologists, unlike engineers, have always examined cycling performance based on a human factors perspective. But. these investigations have always been based on the constraints imposed by the structure of a conventional bicycle. These investigations have included the effects on cycling performance with changes in seat height, crank arm length, pedaling frequencies, workloads, total .workoutput, etc. Therefore, a gap exist between research in the various disciplines. To maximize/optimize cycling performance in human powered vehicles requires a bridging of this gap through interdisciplinary research. The purpose of these investigations were to determine the effect of systematic changes in: (1) body position/configuration (seat tube angle/hip angles); and (2) body orientation (trunk angle with respect to the ground) on cycling performance as defined by power output.

Comments

Supported by a grant-in-aid of research from Sigma XI, The Scientific Research Society.

Citation/Publisher Attribution

Originally published in:

FOURTH INTERNATIONAL HUMAN POWERED VEHICLE SCIENTIFIC SYMPOSIUM August 6, 1992 Yreka, California PROCEEDINGS

Edited by Chester R. Kyle, Jean A. Seay and Joyce S. Kyle

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