Presenter Bio

Cherise Oakley is married with two children and lives in the country with her three dogs. While studying for her MA in English, Creative Writing, she also serves as the department secretary here in the English department at The College at Brockport. When she is not working, reading or writing, Cherise spends her time chauffeuring her kids from soccer, dance, softball and voice lessons.

Presentation Type

Oral presentation-Paper

Presentation Title

The Death of the Angel in the House and the Rise of the Tomboy in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Carson McCullers’ The Member of the Wedding

Session Title

Literature Presentations I

Abstract

Through an examination of Beth March in Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” and John Henry West in Carson McCullers’s “The Member of the Wedding,” each as representatives of the angel in the house, this paper considers the idea of the “suffering child” and the need to kill the angel in the house in sentimental literature in order to affect social commentary and potentially social change—the need to kill Beth and John Henry makes a statement on the death of the queer in favor of the rise of the more socially maneuverable tomboy, lesbianesque characters and their ability to evolve, or perhaps disguise their lesbian potential in order to assimilate. Only with the death of Beth and John Henry, and the negative attachments they represent, can Jo March and Frankie Addams learn how to successfully navigate the societies in which they have been born.

Location

Liberal Arts 202

Start Date

23-4-2016 9:55 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 23rd, 9:55 AM

The Death of the Angel in the House and the Rise of the Tomboy in Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women and Carson McCullers’ The Member of the Wedding

Liberal Arts 202

Through an examination of Beth March in Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” and John Henry West in Carson McCullers’s “The Member of the Wedding,” each as representatives of the angel in the house, this paper considers the idea of the “suffering child” and the need to kill the angel in the house in sentimental literature in order to affect social commentary and potentially social change—the need to kill Beth and John Henry makes a statement on the death of the queer in favor of the rise of the more socially maneuverable tomboy, lesbianesque characters and their ability to evolve, or perhaps disguise their lesbian potential in order to assimilate. Only with the death of Beth and John Henry, and the negative attachments they represent, can Jo March and Frankie Addams learn how to successfully navigate the societies in which they have been born.