Academic Field

Environmental and Earth Sciences, Study, Engineering

Faculty Mentor Name

Barbara Brabetz

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

SUNY Cobleskill has a long history of monitoring water quality in the Schoharie Valley in New York's northern Catskill region. Catastrophic damage to creeks throughout the region affected by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee was exacerbated by some anthropogenic fixes immediately following. As these waterways still threaten the life and livelihood of a good portion of the county, a $20+M federal project to restore these streams and creek is well underway. Our longitudinal studies continue to monitor water quality before and during this comprehensive restoration project. Our results show that some creeks have recovered naturally over the last three years, but others remain unstable and essentially unsustainable environmentally as seen by lack of biological diversity, low alkalinity and high turbidity. We plan to continue monitoring throughout 2015 as the restoration projects conclude.

Keywords

water quality; environmental monitoring; water chemistry

Start Date

10-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:45 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 2:00 PM Apr 10th, 2:45 PM

Monitoring the Planned Restoration of Streambeds following Damage from Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee

SERC House of Fields

SUNY Cobleskill has a long history of monitoring water quality in the Schoharie Valley in New York's northern Catskill region. Catastrophic damage to creeks throughout the region affected by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee was exacerbated by some anthropogenic fixes immediately following. As these waterways still threaten the life and livelihood of a good portion of the county, a $20+M federal project to restore these streams and creek is well underway. Our longitudinal studies continue to monitor water quality before and during this comprehensive restoration project. Our results show that some creeks have recovered naturally over the last three years, but others remain unstable and essentially unsustainable environmentally as seen by lack of biological diversity, low alkalinity and high turbidity. We plan to continue monitoring throughout 2015 as the restoration projects conclude.