Academic Field

English - Literature

Faculty Mentor Name

Jennifer Haytock

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

I first examine the xenophobic motivations of the 1920’s prohibitionist movement through their backing of legislative policies like the “Johnson-Reed Act of 1924,” and their alliance with organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. I also explore some of the social correlations (such as widespread disregard for prohibition in urban areas with large immigrant populations) that led many prohibitionists to adopt nationalist beliefs. I then investigate Hemingway’s portrayal of alcohol in The Sun Also Rises as a form of subversion against not only the racist ideologies of the prohibitionists, but their belief that consuming alcohol was an immoral affair.

Start Date

10-4-2015 9:30 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 11:00 AM

Location

Liberal Arts Bldg 107

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Apr 10th, 9:30 AM Apr 10th, 11:00 AM

Debased: Hemingway’s Not-So-Destructive Portrayal of Alcoholism in The Sun Also Rises

Liberal Arts Bldg 107

I first examine the xenophobic motivations of the 1920’s prohibitionist movement through their backing of legislative policies like the “Johnson-Reed Act of 1924,” and their alliance with organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan. I also explore some of the social correlations (such as widespread disregard for prohibition in urban areas with large immigrant populations) that led many prohibitionists to adopt nationalist beliefs. I then investigate Hemingway’s portrayal of alcohol in The Sun Also Rises as a form of subversion against not only the racist ideologies of the prohibitionists, but their belief that consuming alcohol was an immoral affair.