Academic Field

Psychology

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Constance Dean Qualls

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The theoretical construct of working memory allows new information to be temporarily stored and manipulated (Baddeley, 2003). Working memory is especially important for completing tasks that require comprehension of new information. As typically developing adolescents get older, their cognitive skills (i.e., working memory) continue to develop. Good working memories allow adolescents to be successful academically because they are able to process and recall newly-presented information (i.e., class lecture, books, etc.).Working memory has largely been studied in younger and older adults, with very few studies examining working memory in adolescents. This pilot research examined how well one (1) typically developing adolescent performed on two working memory tasks. The participant was a 14-year old male with no documented language, learning, or reading disability. At the time of the study, the participant had recently completed the 8th grade. He attained age-appropriate scores on two standardized, developmental tests assessing cognitive and language abilities and completed the digit span and alphabet span tests. This presentation will report the results of this study; specifically, the participant’s performance on the experimental, working memory tasks, the implications of this work, conclusions, and future directions on working memory in adolescents.

Keywords

Working Memory

Start Date

10-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:45 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 2:00 PM Apr 10th, 2:45 PM

Working Memory in Typically Developing Adolescents

SERC House of Fields

The theoretical construct of working memory allows new information to be temporarily stored and manipulated (Baddeley, 2003). Working memory is especially important for completing tasks that require comprehension of new information. As typically developing adolescents get older, their cognitive skills (i.e., working memory) continue to develop. Good working memories allow adolescents to be successful academically because they are able to process and recall newly-presented information (i.e., class lecture, books, etc.).Working memory has largely been studied in younger and older adults, with very few studies examining working memory in adolescents. This pilot research examined how well one (1) typically developing adolescent performed on two working memory tasks. The participant was a 14-year old male with no documented language, learning, or reading disability. At the time of the study, the participant had recently completed the 8th grade. He attained age-appropriate scores on two standardized, developmental tests assessing cognitive and language abilities and completed the digit span and alphabet span tests. This presentation will report the results of this study; specifically, the participant’s performance on the experimental, working memory tasks, the implications of this work, conclusions, and future directions on working memory in adolescents.