Academic Field

Contemporary Health Issues

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jill Murphy

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine protects against diseases caused by HPV and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in males in 2009. This study explored factors influencing decision-making about the HPV vaccine in a sample of male college students. In 2011, 1,021 students (including 278 males) were surveyed at two universities in New York State using an internet-based, anonymous survey. Twenty-one percent of males reported having received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. The majority of male respondents (85%) reported that no one had discouraged them from getting the HPV vaccine. The most common sources of encouragement reported by vaccinated males were primary health care provider (75%), parent or guardian (36%), high school health educator (12%) and college health educator (12%). Among unvaccinated males, 76% reported no encouragement to get the vaccine. Two-thirds of unvaccinated males expressed an interest in getting vaccinated. The most common reasons identified for not intending to be vaccinated were: not at risk of HPV infection (64%), not sexually active (35%), and in a monogamous relationship/married (13%). Relatively few males reported concern about side effects, financial barriers, or perceived lack of efficacy as reasons to not get the vaccine. The majority of unvaccinated males express a desire to receive the HPV vaccine. Encouragement by healthcare providers and parents may increase vaccine uptake. Health education messages that emphasize perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and routes of HPV transmission may resonate with those who express no interest in the vaccine.

Keywords

HPV, vaccine, males, college stuents

Start Date

10-4-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 12:00 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 11:15 AM Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

Getting it Up: Improving the HPV Vaccine Uptake Among Male College Students

SERC House of Fields

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine protects against diseases caused by HPV and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in males in 2009. This study explored factors influencing decision-making about the HPV vaccine in a sample of male college students. In 2011, 1,021 students (including 278 males) were surveyed at two universities in New York State using an internet-based, anonymous survey. Twenty-one percent of males reported having received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. The majority of male respondents (85%) reported that no one had discouraged them from getting the HPV vaccine. The most common sources of encouragement reported by vaccinated males were primary health care provider (75%), parent or guardian (36%), high school health educator (12%) and college health educator (12%). Among unvaccinated males, 76% reported no encouragement to get the vaccine. Two-thirds of unvaccinated males expressed an interest in getting vaccinated. The most common reasons identified for not intending to be vaccinated were: not at risk of HPV infection (64%), not sexually active (35%), and in a monogamous relationship/married (13%). Relatively few males reported concern about side effects, financial barriers, or perceived lack of efficacy as reasons to not get the vaccine. The majority of unvaccinated males express a desire to receive the HPV vaccine. Encouragement by healthcare providers and parents may increase vaccine uptake. Health education messages that emphasize perceived susceptibility to HPV infection and routes of HPV transmission may resonate with those who express no interest in the vaccine.