Academic Field

Arts & Humanities

Faculty Mentor Name

Owen Ireland

Presentation Title

George Grenville

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

George Grenville conducted himself in a way honorable to his post. Unlike his predecessors, he did not relish the spoils of his office giving into lavish gifts to himself and salary. Grenville actively sought to consolidate the debt through his unwavering work ethic and honest business ideas. He also sought a new way to govern and control the American colonies. Where most other members of British elite and Parliament turned a deaf ear to American requests, Grenville entertained ideas of their relative freedom and control; most notably in tax collection. Britain and America struggled over finances and financial reformation. America suffered from a depression that made the Currency Act intolerable. The Sugar Act and Stamp Act culminated in the colonists pushing back for the old ways of autonomy under the Old Colonial System. Debt reconciliation attempts left the colonials hostile towards Grenville and Great Britain. Though profitable, the Sugar Act alone did not generate enough money to solve the British debt crisis from the Seven Years War. The Stamp Act caused widespread and active resistance to its policies. Americans marched against the tax and burned their stamps in public. To quell the frustration and rioting, Grenville attempted to let the Americans create their own taxation system to quiet the calls against taxation without representation. Grenville heard and respected the concerns voiced to him by Americans who worried over Britain enacting a direct tax in their country. He called American leaders to Britain and wrote the leaders who could not appear in person, warning them that failure to settle with him would result in a Parliamentary plan being enforced. When not one of those he spoke with could create an American-implemented tax plan, he stayed true to his word and the Parliamentary plan became law.

Keywords

George Grenville, Taxation, American Revolution, Parliament, Great Britain, Prime Minister

Start Date

10-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:45 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 2:00 PM Apr 10th, 2:45 PM

George Grenville

SERC House of Fields

George Grenville conducted himself in a way honorable to his post. Unlike his predecessors, he did not relish the spoils of his office giving into lavish gifts to himself and salary. Grenville actively sought to consolidate the debt through his unwavering work ethic and honest business ideas. He also sought a new way to govern and control the American colonies. Where most other members of British elite and Parliament turned a deaf ear to American requests, Grenville entertained ideas of their relative freedom and control; most notably in tax collection. Britain and America struggled over finances and financial reformation. America suffered from a depression that made the Currency Act intolerable. The Sugar Act and Stamp Act culminated in the colonists pushing back for the old ways of autonomy under the Old Colonial System. Debt reconciliation attempts left the colonials hostile towards Grenville and Great Britain. Though profitable, the Sugar Act alone did not generate enough money to solve the British debt crisis from the Seven Years War. The Stamp Act caused widespread and active resistance to its policies. Americans marched against the tax and burned their stamps in public. To quell the frustration and rioting, Grenville attempted to let the Americans create their own taxation system to quiet the calls against taxation without representation. Grenville heard and respected the concerns voiced to him by Americans who worried over Britain enacting a direct tax in their country. He called American leaders to Britain and wrote the leaders who could not appear in person, warning them that failure to settle with him would result in a Parliamentary plan being enforced. When not one of those he spoke with could create an American-implemented tax plan, he stayed true to his word and the Parliamentary plan became law.