Academic Field

Psychology

Faculty Mentor Name

Karen Singer-Freeman

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

The Baccalaureate & Beyond (B&B) programs at Purchase College, State University of New York are designed to help underrepresented community college students successfully transition to and graduate from 4-year schools. These programs have been at the college for between 10 and 15 years and include an intensive 5-week summer program. In the current study we investigated whether students who participated in the programs and then transferred to Purchase College (n = 75) were more successful than similar community college students who did not participate in the programs before transferring to Purchase College (n = 75). Students were matched for Community College of origin, major and ethnicity. Post-graduate information was retrieved through the National Student Clearing House, and all other information was retrieved from the Purchase College institutional records. We examined major GPA, cumulative GPA, total credits completed, graduation rate, graduation major, graduate school attendance, and graduate degrees. We hypothesized that transfer students who participated in the program would have higher major GPAs and cumulative GPAs, more credits completed, and a higher rate of graduation and graduate school attendance compared to non-participating students. As of Spring 2015, data is being collected.

Keywords

Transfer Student, Bridge Program, STEM

Start Date

10-4-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 12:00 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 11:15 AM Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

Effects of the Bridges to Baccalaureate Program on Student Success

SERC House of Fields

The Baccalaureate & Beyond (B&B) programs at Purchase College, State University of New York are designed to help underrepresented community college students successfully transition to and graduate from 4-year schools. These programs have been at the college for between 10 and 15 years and include an intensive 5-week summer program. In the current study we investigated whether students who participated in the programs and then transferred to Purchase College (n = 75) were more successful than similar community college students who did not participate in the programs before transferring to Purchase College (n = 75). Students were matched for Community College of origin, major and ethnicity. Post-graduate information was retrieved through the National Student Clearing House, and all other information was retrieved from the Purchase College institutional records. We examined major GPA, cumulative GPA, total credits completed, graduation rate, graduation major, graduate school attendance, and graduate degrees. We hypothesized that transfer students who participated in the program would have higher major GPAs and cumulative GPAs, more credits completed, and a higher rate of graduation and graduate school attendance compared to non-participating students. As of Spring 2015, data is being collected.