Presenter Information

Theresa Yera, SUNY at BuffaloFollow

Academic Field

Contemporary Health Issues

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jane Miller and Dr. Emily Greenfield

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

With the rise of healthcare costs and the aging of the US population, recruitment of volunteers is of vital importance to healthcare administrators. Using the linked lives dimension of life course theory, this study examines whether individuals’ recent experiences with caregiving, informal helping, and family health problems predict who volunteers in any arena, and, among volunteers, who volunteers specifically in healthcare. Data are for 1,588 respondents from the 2005 National Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS). We found positive associations between informal helping and family health problems and volunteering (both generally and in healthcare). We also found that providing unpaid assistance increased the odds of both any kind of volunteering and healthcare volunteering. Furthermore, having a parent with health problems, and older age were positively associated with volunteering in healthcare among individuals who volunteer. Recent caregiving was not a predictor of either type of volunteering. Overall, the results suggest that some life experiences and relationships may be elements of what inclines individuals to volunteer in healthcare.

Keywords

volunteer, caregiving, informal helping, family health, statistics, National Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS), linked lives

Start Date

10-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 2:45 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 2:00 PM Apr 10th, 2:45 PM

Does Experience with Caregiving, Informal Helping, and Family Health History Predict Who Volunteers in Healthcare?

SERC House of Fields

With the rise of healthcare costs and the aging of the US population, recruitment of volunteers is of vital importance to healthcare administrators. Using the linked lives dimension of life course theory, this study examines whether individuals’ recent experiences with caregiving, informal helping, and family health problems predict who volunteers in any arena, and, among volunteers, who volunteers specifically in healthcare. Data are for 1,588 respondents from the 2005 National Survey of Midlife in the United States (MIDUS). We found positive associations between informal helping and family health problems and volunteering (both generally and in healthcare). We also found that providing unpaid assistance increased the odds of both any kind of volunteering and healthcare volunteering. Furthermore, having a parent with health problems, and older age were positively associated with volunteering in healthcare among individuals who volunteer. Recent caregiving was not a predictor of either type of volunteering. Overall, the results suggest that some life experiences and relationships may be elements of what inclines individuals to volunteer in healthcare.