Academic Field

Psychology

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Andrea Zevenbergen

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Abstract

This study aims to examine relations between age and academic performance, locus of control, academic self-efficacy, and effective study habits in college students. Previous research has shown that individuals with a strong internal locus of control are likely to have greater academic achievement than individuals with a strong external locus of control. Effective study habits and a high academic self-efficacy also have been found to be positively correlated with higher academic achievement. It is hypothesized that traditionally aged third and fourth year students will have a higher internal locus of control, higher academic self-efficacy, and more effective study habits than traditionally aged first and second year students. Approximately 100 participants will complete measures of locus of control, academic self-efficacy, and effective study habits. Scores from these measures will be analyzed in relation to age, academic year, and GPA range. Data collection and analysis for this project will be completed by March 31.

Keywords

Keywords: Academic self-efficacy, locus of control, study habits, academic grade level

Start Date

10-4-2015 11:15 AM

End Date

10-4-2015 12:00 PM

Location

SERC House of Fields

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Apr 10th, 11:15 AM Apr 10th, 12:00 PM

Relations Between Age and Internal Locus of Control, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Effective Study Habits in College Students

SERC House of Fields

This study aims to examine relations between age and academic performance, locus of control, academic self-efficacy, and effective study habits in college students. Previous research has shown that individuals with a strong internal locus of control are likely to have greater academic achievement than individuals with a strong external locus of control. Effective study habits and a high academic self-efficacy also have been found to be positively correlated with higher academic achievement. It is hypothesized that traditionally aged third and fourth year students will have a higher internal locus of control, higher academic self-efficacy, and more effective study habits than traditionally aged first and second year students. Approximately 100 participants will complete measures of locus of control, academic self-efficacy, and effective study habits. Scores from these measures will be analyzed in relation to age, academic year, and GPA range. Data collection and analysis for this project will be completed by March 31.