Academic Field

Psychology

Faculty Mentor Name

Leonard Simms

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

Investigation of the Psychometric Properties of the Informant-Report Form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

The current paper evaluates the psychometric properties of the informant-report form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5-IRF). The study tested the validity of the form on a clinical sample in the Western New York area. The relationship was tested using the Personal Acquaintance Measure in order to determine the closeness of the patient to their acquaintance. The average relationship between the target and informant was close enough that there would be reason to believe that the forms could be answered similarly by both parties. Self-informant correlations supported the item categorization into personality traits, with little statistical difference between the original study and the present study. However, most of the resulting trait domain correlations were weaker for the current study, which may require additional evaluation of this grouping of the items. The PID-5-IRF shows support for the validity of the personality trait categorizations but there appears to be little evidence that the domains can remain as is. Further examination must be made to determine what features may contribute to the discrepancies in the self-informant agreement of the trait domains. The promise of the form may provide improvements to the assessment of personality for the purpose of research in the field of clinical psychology.

Keywords

personality, self – other report, DSM, personality measure, PID-5-IRF, psychometrics

Start Date

10-4-2015 4:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 5:30 PM

Location

Hartwell Hall 218

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Apr 10th, 4:15 PM Apr 10th, 5:30 PM

Investigation of the Psychometric Properties of the Informant-Report Form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

Hartwell Hall 218

Investigation of the Psychometric Properties of the Informant-Report Form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5

The current paper evaluates the psychometric properties of the informant-report form of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5-IRF). The study tested the validity of the form on a clinical sample in the Western New York area. The relationship was tested using the Personal Acquaintance Measure in order to determine the closeness of the patient to their acquaintance. The average relationship between the target and informant was close enough that there would be reason to believe that the forms could be answered similarly by both parties. Self-informant correlations supported the item categorization into personality traits, with little statistical difference between the original study and the present study. However, most of the resulting trait domain correlations were weaker for the current study, which may require additional evaluation of this grouping of the items. The PID-5-IRF shows support for the validity of the personality trait categorizations but there appears to be little evidence that the domains can remain as is. Further examination must be made to determine what features may contribute to the discrepancies in the self-informant agreement of the trait domains. The promise of the form may provide improvements to the assessment of personality for the purpose of research in the field of clinical psychology.