Academic Field

Theatre Arts, Music

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Holly Bewlay

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to further explore the treatment of the tenor[i][1] passaggio (F4-F#4)[ii][2], specifically as it pertains to the repertoire of the American Musical Theatre[iii][3] for a college student. According to Richard Miller, tenore robusto (dramatic tenor’s) second passaggio occurs in the region described (F4-F#4)[4]. I sought to explore the treatment of this passaggio in Younger than Springtime (South Pacific), Later (A Little Night Music), Maria (West Side Story), Giants in the Sky (Into the Woods), and Something’s Coming (West Side Story) with the prospect of performing these pieces with a smooth transition during the second passaggio at the end of the research period.

[1] Unknown. Tenor, n.2; Music. OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2014. Web. 22 August 2014.

[2] Ware, Clifton. Adventures in Singing: A Process for Exploring, Discovering, and Developing Vocal Potential. 4th ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill. 2008. Print.

[3] Hanning, Barbara Russano. Concise History of Western Music. 4th ed. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc, 2010. Print.

[4] Miller, Richard. The Structure of Singing. New York, NY: Schirmer Books, 1986. Pg. 116. Print.

[i] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a Tenor voice is defined as the male voice type intermediate between bass and counter-tenor (or alto) typically ranging from the octave below middle C to the A above it. Although this definition is broad, it provides a clearer understanding of this voice type.

[ii] The passaggio, as defined by Clifton Ware, is a series of pitches wherein multiple tones may be produced by varying register principals and includes the approximate pitch(es) where the register transition takes place.

[iii] Hanning defines the American Musical Theatre as a genre that features song and dance numbers stylistically drawn from popular music in theatrical form with either romantic or comedic plots.

Keywords

Passaggio, Tenor, Musical Theater

Start Date

10-4-2015 4:15 PM

End Date

10-4-2015 5:30 PM

Location

Liberal Arts Bldg 102

Share

COinS
 
Apr 10th, 4:15 PM Apr 10th, 5:30 PM

Tenor Passaggio in the repertoire of the American Musical Theatre

Liberal Arts Bldg 102

The purpose of this research was to further explore the treatment of the tenor[i][1] passaggio (F4-F#4)[ii][2], specifically as it pertains to the repertoire of the American Musical Theatre[iii][3] for a college student. According to Richard Miller, tenore robusto (dramatic tenor’s) second passaggio occurs in the region described (F4-F#4)[4]. I sought to explore the treatment of this passaggio in Younger than Springtime (South Pacific), Later (A Little Night Music), Maria (West Side Story), Giants in the Sky (Into the Woods), and Something’s Coming (West Side Story) with the prospect of performing these pieces with a smooth transition during the second passaggio at the end of the research period.

[1] Unknown. Tenor, n.2; Music. OED Online. Oxford University Press, June 2014. Web. 22 August 2014.

[2] Ware, Clifton. Adventures in Singing: A Process for Exploring, Discovering, and Developing Vocal Potential. 4th ed. New York, NY: McGraw Hill. 2008. Print.

[3] Hanning, Barbara Russano. Concise History of Western Music. 4th ed. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc, 2010. Print.

[4] Miller, Richard. The Structure of Singing. New York, NY: Schirmer Books, 1986. Pg. 116. Print.

[i] According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a Tenor voice is defined as the male voice type intermediate between bass and counter-tenor (or alto) typically ranging from the octave below middle C to the A above it. Although this definition is broad, it provides a clearer understanding of this voice type.

[ii] The passaggio, as defined by Clifton Ware, is a series of pitches wherein multiple tones may be produced by varying register principals and includes the approximate pitch(es) where the register transition takes place.

[iii] Hanning defines the American Musical Theatre as a genre that features song and dance numbers stylistically drawn from popular music in theatrical form with either romantic or comedic plots.