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Experiment 1 was used to determine the effect of systematic manipulation of five body positions (seat tube angle) and configurations (hip angle) on cycling performance while controlling for body orientation (trunk angle with respect to the ground). Sixteen male subjects (21-35 years of age) were tested in each of five different body positions (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 degrees) as defined by the angle formed between the seat tube and a vertical line. The seat backrest was kept perpendicular to the ground. It was determined from repeated measures MANOVAs, Dunnetts' multiple comparison tests and trend analysis that: (1) for total work output and maximal aerobic energy expenditure, performance in the 75 degree seat tube angle position (76.8 degree mean hip angle configuration) was significantly greater (p $<$.01) than all the other positions, except for the 50 degree seat tube angle (100 degree mean hip angle); and (2) a quadratic trend (p $<$.01) best describe the trend in total work output and maximal aerobic energy expenditure with changes in body position and configuration.

Experiment 2 was used to determine the effect of systematic manipulation of three body orientation on cycling performance while controlling for body position and configuration. Ten male subjects (24-35 years of age) were tested in each of three body orientations (60, 90, and 120 degrees) as defined by the angle formed between the seat backrest and a horizontal line parallel to the ground. The body position selected had a seat tube angle of 75 degrees. It was determined from repeated measures MANOVAs and trend analysis that there were no significant differences or apparent trends in maximal aerobic energy expenditures and total work output with changes in body orientation.

Publication Date

1989

Publication Information

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Disciplines

Exercise Science | Kinesiology

Department

Kinesiology, Sport Studies and Physical Education

Comments

Copyright 1989 Danny Too

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology in the Graduate College of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1989

The Effect of Body Position, Configuration, and Orientation on Cycling Performance

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