Description

This first panelist looks at the sexual assault of irregular migrant women on the journey and arrival to the United States/Mexico border from a feminist intersectional perspective. The research combines the academic studies with data regarding irregular migration, militarization of the border, and gender statistics. In applying intersectionality, the subject is analyzed through three axes of power: militarization, legal status, and gender. In analyzing the connections and imbrications of systems of power, it becomes clear that the subjects in question are marginalized and subordinated in various and interconnected ways. The second panelist focuses on the case of Venezuelan emigrants in order to contest refugee law and international migrant legislation. Fragments-of-life-stories & semi-structured interviews were used within a bottom-up approach were thematic axes were interpreted from the subjective experiences of the interviewees, and document research including NGO reports was conducted from a top-down perspective, aiming to provide a cohesive and comprehensive picture of what it means to be a Venezuelan emigrant.

Participants will come away with a better understanding of intersectionality’s flexibility and relevance to today’s issues, especially regarding migration.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will be able see the use of intersectionality as a feminist tool to better understand subjects.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will be able to identify subjugation approaches embedded in the international migration framework which systematically segregate migration.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will be able to better recognize structural and cultural issues that surround migration and its related policies and stigma

Presenter(s)

Laura Clark ’13, Recent Graduate, Erasmus Mundus Masters in Human Rights Practice, University of Roehampton, University of Deusto, and University of Rehampton Laura Clark ‘13 graduated with a BA in Spanish and women & gender studies, a French minor, and was a member of the Honors College. Ms. Clark’s commitment to the College was shown as a member and then mentor of living learning communities, resident assistant for first-year students, member of Alpha Phi Omega, and a participant in several study abroad programs. After graduating she was a Fulbright recipient in Spain. She recently completed a two-year master’s program in Europe through Erasmus Mundus. She aspires to work with human rights issues, focusing on gender equality needs.

Lis Cristina Santamaria Garcia, Recent Graduate, Erasmus Mundus Masters in Human Rights Practice and Policy Lis Santamaria is a Clinical Community Psychologist and researcher from Caracas, Venezuela. In her country of origin, she has worked with vulnerable and at-risk populations such as refugees, victims of criminal violence, students within the special education system, and homeless persons with substance abuse issues. Ms. Santamaria was involved in her community through Human Rights activism including LGBT Rights. She recently finished her Erasmus Mundus master’s degree, and is very interested in the qualitative paradigm for research.

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Oct 5th, 11:00 AM Oct 5th, 12:15 PM

Migration and Intersectionality: Irregular Migration and Sexual Assault, Life Stories of Venezuelan Emigrants

Seymour College Union, Gallery

This first panelist looks at the sexual assault of irregular migrant women on the journey and arrival to the United States/Mexico border from a feminist intersectional perspective. The research combines the academic studies with data regarding irregular migration, militarization of the border, and gender statistics. In applying intersectionality, the subject is analyzed through three axes of power: militarization, legal status, and gender. In analyzing the connections and imbrications of systems of power, it becomes clear that the subjects in question are marginalized and subordinated in various and interconnected ways. The second panelist focuses on the case of Venezuelan emigrants in order to contest refugee law and international migrant legislation. Fragments-of-life-stories & semi-structured interviews were used within a bottom-up approach were thematic axes were interpreted from the subjective experiences of the interviewees, and document research including NGO reports was conducted from a top-down perspective, aiming to provide a cohesive and comprehensive picture of what it means to be a Venezuelan emigrant.

Participants will come away with a better understanding of intersectionality’s flexibility and relevance to today’s issues, especially regarding migration.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will be able see the use of intersectionality as a feminist tool to better understand subjects.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will be able to identify subjugation approaches embedded in the international migration framework which systematically segregate migration.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will be able to better recognize structural and cultural issues that surround migration and its related policies and stigma