Description

Intersectionality, first introduced by Kimberle Crenshaw, has become a widely accepted framework for understating how exclusion and discrimination operate through multiple interlocking systems of oppression including but not limited to racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia that impact individuals in multiple complex ways. As disability emerges as a recognized social identity, it is important to bring the existing understandings of intersectionality to light on the lives of those who identify as disabled. Seeing disability as a part of a shared identity that includes race, class, gender, gender identification, and sexual orientation can expand our understandings of learning, community, accessibility, politics, human interdependence, equity, and access within higher education. Looking at ways that ideologies of ableism have contributed to biases in relation to women, queer people, and people of color can also help us understand how these interlocking systems affect all of us, even if we think of them as being concerns for “someone else. “This session will address how disability studies, critical race theory, queer theory, and feminist theory can help us to better understand how systems that exclude, label, or marginalize some of us, limit the freedoms and full humanity of all of us.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Gain a greater understanding of intersectionality.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Recognize how disability intersects with race, class, gender, gender identification, and sexual orientation to create complex social identities, and how ableism has helped to construct racial, gender, class, and sexual identities.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Become more critically reflective about how you understand disability as a social identity in your interactions in our campus community.

Presenter(s)

Milo Obourn, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of English, The College at Brockport Milo Obourn is an associate professor of English, where they teach courses in gender and sexuality, disability studies, critical race theory, and American literature. Dr. Obourn is the author of Reconstituting Americans: Liberal Multiculturalism and Identity Difference in Post-1960s Literature and is currently working on a project entitled Disabled Futures: Disability Theory and the Legacies of Identity Politics. Their work has also appeared in American Literature, MELUS, Twentieth Century Literature, Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society, and Contemporary Literature.

Jennifer Ashton, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Education and Human Development, The College at Brockport Jennifer Ashton is an assistant professor of education, where she teaches courses in inclusive and special education. Dr. Ashton uses a Disability Studies in Education framework to study inclusive education, preservice teacher education, and service learning. Her work has appeared in the International Journal of Inclusive Education, the International Journal of Whole Schooling, Classroom Discourse, and Schools: Studies in Education.

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Oct 5th, 3:30 PM Oct 5th, 4:45 PM

Disability as an Intersectional Social Identity

Hartwell Hall, Room 122

Intersectionality, first introduced by Kimberle Crenshaw, has become a widely accepted framework for understating how exclusion and discrimination operate through multiple interlocking systems of oppression including but not limited to racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia that impact individuals in multiple complex ways. As disability emerges as a recognized social identity, it is important to bring the existing understandings of intersectionality to light on the lives of those who identify as disabled. Seeing disability as a part of a shared identity that includes race, class, gender, gender identification, and sexual orientation can expand our understandings of learning, community, accessibility, politics, human interdependence, equity, and access within higher education. Looking at ways that ideologies of ableism have contributed to biases in relation to women, queer people, and people of color can also help us understand how these interlocking systems affect all of us, even if we think of them as being concerns for “someone else. “This session will address how disability studies, critical race theory, queer theory, and feminist theory can help us to better understand how systems that exclude, label, or marginalize some of us, limit the freedoms and full humanity of all of us.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Gain a greater understanding of intersectionality.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Recognize how disability intersects with race, class, gender, gender identification, and sexual orientation to create complex social identities, and how ableism has helped to construct racial, gender, class, and sexual identities.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Become more critically reflective about how you understand disability as a social identity in your interactions in our campus community.