Description

Ms. Hidley will argue that the narrative techniques in Sebold’s novel Lucky parallel the way in which trauma is processed, and this narrative form allows readers access to new and shared language where they can name their injuries and begin to heal. Sebold’s type of trauma, age, race, class, sexual orientation, closeness of friendships, and other factors, play a role in her ability to process her trauma. Relying upon Judith Butler’s insistence that social and bodily limits be exposed to provide a more dynamic field of the human, Ms. Mulvihill will examine Ali Smith’s Hotel World as a text that resists bodily limits and Tom McCarthy’s Remainder as a text that attempts to expand the boundaries of normative social interactions. We must reject past interpretations of ethical understandings to expand the contours of the grievable, normative body. Mr. Bodensteiner will explore the ways in which Sherman Alexie uses the space of the basketball court to address questions of self and cultural identity. The meritocracy of basketball allows Junior, Alexie’s young adult protagonist, to begin dismantling the cultural binary of whites and Native Americans, while the competitive nature of sport reinforces some of these differences.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will learn how literature might be used as a vehicle of social critique and tool to combat inequality.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will improve their ability to identify and understand interlocking systems of oppression.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will explore how literature can resist limiting the definition of human.

Presenter(s)

Moderator

Kristen Proehl, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of English, The College at Brockport Dr. Kristen Proehl teaches courses in children’s, young adult, and American literature. She has published a queer-theoretical article on Carson McCullers’s The Member of the Wedding in Jeunesse and has contributed articles to several essay collections, including Romantic Education in Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Routledge, 2014) and Carson McCullers in the Twenty-First Century (Palgrave, 2016), among others. She is currently revising a book titled Battling Girlhood: Sympathy, Social Justice, and the Tomboy Figure in American Literature and working on a companion project on queer friendship in adolescent literature.

Panelists

Braden Bodensteiner, Graduate Student in English Literature, The College at Brockport and 7th and 8th Grade English Teacher at Siena Catholic Academy Braden Bodensteiner is pursuing his MA in English at The College at Brockport and is projected to graduate in the fall of 2018. Braden received his bachelor’s degree in English and adolescent education from Nazareth College in 2012. He has taught English to seventh and eighth graders at Siena Catholic Academy for the last five years. Braden, an avid runner, has also served as the school’s head coach for the modified track and field team since 2014.

Rachael Mulvihill ’16. Graduate Student in English Literature, The College at Brockport Rachael Mulvihill earned her associate’s degree in paralegal studies and a bachelor’s degree in creative writing. She works full-time as a paralegal at Shapiro, DiCaro & Barak, LLC. She has participated in literary conferences entitled “Wharton in Washington” and “Segue,” and has been published in the Gandy Dancer. She is mostly interested in queer and disability studies, and also has a passion for war literature. She has received the Blaine M. DeLancey Memorial Award, the Lena Sunseri Piedmont Award, and the Maggie Fox Poetry Award.

Annie Hidley ’17, 11th and 12th Grade English Teacher, Brockport High School

Annie Hidley, a graduate of the master’s program in English Literature, is an 11th and 12th grade English teacher at Brockport High School. She began this project with interest in the ways in which young adult fiction and non-fiction can be of use to adolescents who have undergone trauma. It is important to her to explore texts that creatively express how their authors found connection in their lives after trauma. Ms. Hidley’s goal is to expose students to a diverse variety of texts with the hope that they might discover language that is accessible to them, and ultimately feel less alone.

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Trauma Memoir Hidley

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Oct 5th, 3:30 PM Oct 5th, 4:45 PM

Trauma, the Body, and Intersections of Identity in Literature: Transcending Limits (Panel)

Seymour Gallery

Ms. Hidley will argue that the narrative techniques in Sebold’s novel Lucky parallel the way in which trauma is processed, and this narrative form allows readers access to new and shared language where they can name their injuries and begin to heal. Sebold’s type of trauma, age, race, class, sexual orientation, closeness of friendships, and other factors, play a role in her ability to process her trauma. Relying upon Judith Butler’s insistence that social and bodily limits be exposed to provide a more dynamic field of the human, Ms. Mulvihill will examine Ali Smith’s Hotel World as a text that resists bodily limits and Tom McCarthy’s Remainder as a text that attempts to expand the boundaries of normative social interactions. We must reject past interpretations of ethical understandings to expand the contours of the grievable, normative body. Mr. Bodensteiner will explore the ways in which Sherman Alexie uses the space of the basketball court to address questions of self and cultural identity. The meritocracy of basketball allows Junior, Alexie’s young adult protagonist, to begin dismantling the cultural binary of whites and Native Americans, while the competitive nature of sport reinforces some of these differences.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will learn how literature might be used as a vehicle of social critique and tool to combat inequality.

GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will improve their ability to identify and understand interlocking systems of oppression.

GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will explore how literature can resist limiting the definition of human.