Storytelling for Success: Auto-ethnography and Black Feminist Epistemology

Tanya Thompson, SUNY Empire State College

Presenter Tanya Thompson, Graduate Student in Adult Learning, SUNY Empire State College
Tanya Thompson holds a BS in community and human services from SUNY Empire State College and is currently completing a master’s degree in adult learning. She is co-founder of Education for All, an organization dedicated to ensuring higher education access and equity for marginalized populations. Her advocacy leadership was instrumental in the passing of a resolution by New York State’s Governor to remove “the box” that specifically asks SUNY applicants about their justice-involved histories. This precedential move is significant for a large proportion of prospective SUNY students and brings the university closer to fully exercising its mission.

Description

Collins (2009) in theorizing Black feminist epistemology asserts that African American women’s lived experiences serve as a "cutting edge" between knowledge and wisdom. Personal narratives, therefore, are particularly useful for documenting and sharing Black women’s experiences towards the development of Black feminist thought as specialized knowledge. This session specifically centers on the experience of formerly incarcerated Black women navigating reentry to avoid recidivism. The presentation demonstrates how, using auto-ethnography and Collins’ conceptualization of domination operating via four interlocking power domains, individuals can recognize and develop strategies for enabling and supporting formerly incarcerated Black women’s transformation, liberation and empowerment. In particular, the session presents one formerly incarcerated Black woman’s story of how she dealt with overlapping reentry challenges to realize academic success. Participants will be invited to share in the presentation during a question and answer section with the presenter.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will be able to distinguish alternative ways of producing and validating knowledge
GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will be able to recognize auto-ethnography as a valuable tool in knowledge-creation
GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will be able to recognize and develop strategies for enabling and supporting formerly incarcerated Black women’s

 
Oct 5th, 3:30 PM Oct 5th, 4:45 PM

Storytelling for Success: Auto-ethnography and Black Feminist Epistemology

Collins (2009) in theorizing Black feminist epistemology asserts that African American women’s lived experiences serve as a "cutting edge" between knowledge and wisdom. Personal narratives, therefore, are particularly useful for documenting and sharing Black women’s experiences towards the development of Black feminist thought as specialized knowledge. This session specifically centers on the experience of formerly incarcerated Black women navigating reentry to avoid recidivism. The presentation demonstrates how, using auto-ethnography and Collins’ conceptualization of domination operating via four interlocking power domains, individuals can recognize and develop strategies for enabling and supporting formerly incarcerated Black women’s transformation, liberation and empowerment. In particular, the session presents one formerly incarcerated Black woman’s story of how she dealt with overlapping reentry challenges to realize academic success. Participants will be invited to share in the presentation during a question and answer section with the presenter.

GOAL/OUTCOME #1 Participants will be able to distinguish alternative ways of producing and validating knowledge
GOAL/OUTCOME #2 Participants will be able to recognize auto-ethnography as a valuable tool in knowledge-creation
GOAL/OUTCOME #3 Participants will be able to recognize and develop strategies for enabling and supporting formerly incarcerated Black women’s