Date of Award

8-1978

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Department

Education and Human Development

First Advisor

Dr. Arthur Smith

Abstract

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the effects of a diagnostic-prescriptive teaching system on the total reading comprehension scores of fourth and fifth grade students of varying achievements in reading. The study also examined which achievement level of students benefited the most from exposure to a diagnostic-prescriptive teaching system for reading. Three hypotheses dealing with method of instruction, achievement, and their interactions were tested. A sample, population of 108 (54 males, 54 females) fourth and fifth grade students was used. The control group utilized various basal programs. The experimental group employed various basal programs that were augmented by a diagnostic-prescriptive system for reading (Houghton-Mifflin, IPMS). Instrumentation included the Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test (Levels I and II, Form W) as well as pretests, interim mastery tests, and posttests from the IPMS system. Significant differences and interactions were assessed by analysis of variance. There was no significant difference in the comprehension mean gain scores of both groups with respect to method of instruction. At both grade levels for both groups, there was a highly significant effect on comprehension mean gain scores with respect to achievement. Interaction effects were significant effect on comprehension mean gain scores with respect to achievement. Interaction effects were significant at the fourth grade level but not at the fifth grade level.

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