Date of Award

Spring 2008

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Department

Education and Human Development

Abstract

Maintaining student involvement and enthusiasm continues to be a struggle in my 12:1 :1 grade 3- 5 self-contained classroom. Teaching effective lessons is a challenging feat in a self-contained setting because the students have multiple learning problems with the addition of behavioral difficulties. A common thread between successful lessons is the incorporation of choice making. The four-week study consisted of four students who were provided a choice during the guided practice and independent practice portion of their math, ELA, lifeskills and OT/PT lessons. Students were provided choices throughout instruction during one subject area per week. The results were compared to the three weeks where they were not provided choices. An observational rubric, student work, and classroom observations were all used to gauge engagement throughout lesson, student ability to demonstrate knowledge/skills and generalization of knowledge. The results of the study show that offering choices is a positive teaching strategy to use with students who have disabilities. Both the lengths of time engaged during guided and independent practice increased along with students' ability to generalize skill and content knowledge. Offering students choices throughout instruction also decreases problem behaviors.

Share

COinS