Date of Award

12-1998

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science in Education (MSEd)

Department

Education and Human Development

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine if one particular lesson design is more-effective in teaching vocabulary words and definitions to second grade students. Eight separate paired two sample t-tests were used to investigate the research questions presented in this study:

(1) Is there a statistically significant difference between the mean post-test scores of the students who were taught vocabulary words and definitions using the Hunter lesson design, and students who were taught vocabulary definitions using the multiple intelligence model, created by David Lazeer?

(2) Which lesson design will produce greater student success for retention of the already learned vocabulary words?

The subjects in this study were 17 second grade students in Western New York. The students were split into two heterogeneously mixed groups. During the study, both groups A and B were taught new vocabulary words and definitions in an effort to enhance pre-reading skills prior to starting a new story in the second grade reading program. Both groups A and B were taught the same vocabulary words and definitions simultaneously by one of their second grade team teachers. Group A was taught the first three lessons with the multiple intelligence model. Group B was taught the first three units of study with the Hunter lesson design. After each lesson both groups' abilities were measured by the exact same matching test, which was designed for this study. Both groups were then given a cumulative vocabulary test to measure the retention of the words. At this point, both groups switched lesson designs during the final three units of study. Group A was taught with the Hunter model, while group B was taught with the multiple intelligence model. Again the students were tested with the exact same matching tests, then were tested for retention of the vocabulary words and definitions from the final three units of study.

The tests found no significant statistical differences in any of the research questions. Students taught with the multiple intelligence model had a higher mean score when compared to students taught with the Hunter model. Students taught with the multiple intelligence model also had a higher mean score than the Hunter model when testing for retention of the new vocabulary words and definitions. Each approach was equally effective.

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