Date of Award

8-1979

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Kinesiology, Sport Studies and Physical Education

First Advisor

Dr. John M. Silva, III

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to experimentally compare the effect of two sensory aids on the running performance of 40 female and 40 male visually handicapped subjects participating in a 40 yard dash. The subjects ranged in age from 6-21 and attended various schools and institutions in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. The subjects were blocked according to sex and randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions. Those assigned to treatment one utilized an audible goal locator. Those assigned to treatment two utilized a tactual guide wire. The subjects were tested individually. A timed performance score was recorded for each subject. A 2 x 2 factorial design for the variables of sex and sensory aid was used. The analysis of variance indicated that there was no significant difference in the scores of subjects utilizing an audible goal locator as compared to a tactual guide wire. A significant (p ≤ .001) main effect for sex was found. Visually handicapped males performed significantly faster than females. This finding supported research concerning visually impaired males and females on various physical performance tests.

No significant interactive effect was noted for the variables of sex and sensory aid. Mean examination indicated that females performed slightly faster utilizing the audible goal locator while males performed slightly faster using the tactual guide wire. Suggestions were offered in an attempt to further research concerning performances of visually handicapped individuals, in various physical settings and for evaluating the effectiveness of sensory aids.

Comments

Repository staff redacted information not essential to the integrity of this thesis to protect privacy.

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